Why some human genes are more popular with researchers than others

Historical bias is a key reason why biomedical researchers continue to study the same 10 percent of all human genes while ignoring many genes known to play roles in disease, according to a new study. This bias is bolstered by research funding mechanisms and social forces.

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How cells repurpose their garbage disposal systems to promote inflammation

Researchers have unraveled new insights into the way cells leverage G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and their cellular waste disposal systems to control inflammation. The findings suggest some existing cancer drugs that inhibit these cellular activities might be repurposed to treat vascular inflammation, which occurs when artery-blocking plaques form in atherosclerosis.

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Geoscientists find unexpected ‘deep creep’ near San Andreas, San Jacinto faults

A new analysis of thousands of very small earthquakes in the San Bernardino basin suggests that the unusual deformation of some may be due to 'deep creep' 10 km below the Earth's surface, say geoscientists. They say scientists should not use the information recorded by these small earthquakes to predict loading of the nearby San Andreas and San Jacinto faults.

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