Cope’s gray treefrogs meet the cocktail party problem

Our auditory system is able to home in on the message being conveyed by the person you're talking with even in a noisy room full of people. The secret to rising above the noise -- a dilemma known in the world of sound science as 'the cocktail party problem' -- turns out to lie in its ability to discern patterns in the background noise and selectively ignore such patterns, according to a new study.

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Effectiveness of antipsychotic treatments in patients with schizophrenia

A new study examines the comparative effectiveness of antipsychotic treatments for the prevention of psychiatric rehospitalization and treatment failure among a nationwide group of patients with schizophrenia in Sweden.

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Data from satellite imagery useful for malaria early warning systems

A new model has been created that uses seasonal weather data from satellite images to accurately predict outbreak of malaria with a one-month lead time. With a so-called GAMBOOST model, a host of weather information gathered from satellite images can be used as a cost-effective disease forecasting model, allowing health officials to get ahead of the malaria infection curve by allocating resources and mobilizing public health responses.

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Newly discovered methane consumers in lakes

When decaying organic matter sinks to the bottom of a lake or ocean, methane is produced as the biomass is broken down. Some of the methane is released from the surface into the atmosphere, where it acts as a potent greenhouse gas, while some is broken down by microorganisms in the water column. In a new study, an international research group reports that, as well as the “classical” methane consumers, filamentous bacteria of the genus Crenothrix – previously little studied in the environment – are also involved in the methane removal process.

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