Fox-1Cliff Currently Scheduled for November 19 Launch

Fox-1Cliff CubeSat

Fox-1Cliff CubeSat

AMSAT is counting down to the launch of the next Fox-1 satellite, Fox-1Cliff.

Per Spaceflight Now, the launch of Spaceflight’s SSO-A SmallSat Express mission, on a SpaceX Falcon 9 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, is currently scheduled for November 19, 2018 at 18:32 UTC.

Fox-1Cliff carries the Fox-1 U/v FM repeater, AMSAT’s L-Band Downshifter, the flight spare of the AO-85 Vanderbilt University Low Energy Proton (LEP) radiation experiment, and the standard Fox-1 Penn State University–Erie MEMS gyroscope experiment. Virginia Tech provided a VGA camera which is the same as AO-92’s but will provide images at a higher 640 x 480 resolution. Additional information about the launch and early operations phase (LEOP) will be released prior to launch.

As part of the preparations for the launch of Fox-1Cliff, AMSAT is making the “Getting Started With Amateur Satellites” book available for a limited time as a download with any paid new or renewal membership purchased via the AMSAT Store. This offer is only
available with purchases completed online, and for only a limited time. A perennial favorite, Getting Started is updated every year with the latest amateur satellite information, and is the premier primer of satellite operation. The 186 page book is presented in PDF format, in full color, and covers all aspects of making your first contacts on a ham radio satellite.

Please take advantage of this offer today by visiting the AMSAT store at https://www.amsat.org/shop/ and selecting any membership option.

While there, check out AMSAT’s other items, including the M2 LEOpack antenna system, Arrow antennas, AMSAT shirts, and other swag. Be sure to view your cart before going to checkout. If you add a membership and then go directly to checkout, you’ll never see an option to add your free gift.

Fox-1Cliff is named in honor of long-time AMSAT member, contributor, and benefactor Cliff Buttschardt, K7RR (SK), who passed away in 2016. Cliff’s contributions to AMSAT and other amateur satellite programs, including serving as an adviser during the initial development of the CubeSat specification at California Polytechnic State University, earned him the Lifetime Achievement Award from Project OSCAR in 2006.

Source AMSAT News Service https://www.amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/ans

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Video of Es’hail-2 geostationary amateur radio transponders talk

More videos from the AMSAT-UK Colloquium, part of the RSGB Convention, held at Milton Keynes Oct 13-14, are now available on the AMSAT-UK YouTube Channel.

Among the presentations is one about the amateur radio transponders on the satellite Es’hail-2 expected to be launched into a geostationary orbit soon.

Es’hail-2 and its Amateur Radio payload by Graham Shirville G3VZV and Dave Crump G8GKQ

Read an article on the Es’hail-2 transponders at
http://rsgb.org/main/files/2018/11/7.1x_AMSAT-UK_Eshail-2_Transponder_Info.pdf

Other videos can be seen at https://www.youtube.com/user/AMSATUK/videos

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FCC Satellite Related Filings

FCC SealFor easier navigation of US FCC Satellite related filings Luke Rehmann has built an RSS feed of the FCC’s ELS and IBFS systems.

The FCC Experimental Licensing System provides companies with temporary authorization to conduct temporary experimental wireless communication lab-testing, space launch/recovery communication, and other short-duration wireless communication needs
https://fcc.report/ELS/

The International Bureau administers international telecommunications and satellite programs and policies, including licensing and regulatory functions. The bureau also promotes pro-competitive policies abroad, coordinates global spectrum activities and advocates U.S. interests in international communications and competition
https://fcc.report/IBFS/

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Ham radio satellites on 5 Euro coin

Lithuania 5 Euro Gold Coin 2018

Lithuania 5 Euro Gold Coin 2018

The Bank of Lithuania (Lietuvos bankas) has released a commemorative gold 5 Euro coin featuring the amateur radio satellites LituanicaSAT-1 (LO-78) and LitSAT-1.

The two CubeSats were launched to the International Space Station (ISS) on January 9, 2014 and deployed from the ISS on February 28. LituanicaSAT-1 carried a FM transponder and a camera while LitSat-1 had a linear (SSB/CW) transponder developed by William Leijenaar PE1RAH.

The face of the gold coin features the Lithuanian coat of arms (Vytis) as a star constellation with LituanicaSAT-1 and LitSAT-1 on the reverse

Watch A gold coin of 5 euros for technology education

Numista catalogue entry https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces151686.html

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Galileo GPS – FCC to vote on use of signals in USA

FCC SealThe Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has said it will vote in November on whether to allow U.S. GPS receivers to access the Galileo global navigation satellite system (GNSS).

From an Amateur Radio perspective the key part is that the FCC will only be voting to waive its licensing requirements for non-federal operations with Galileo channels E1 and E5, subject to certain technical constraints.

This means they will not be voting on the E6 channel 1260-1300 MHz, these frequencies are also Amateur and Amateur-Satellite Service allocations. This suggests for 1260-1300 MHz the situation in the USA will be unchanged, the unlicensed use of the Galileo signal on channel E6 will not be permitted for non-Federal operations in the USA.

Read the Reuters story at
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-fcc-gps-europe/fcc-to-vote-to-allow-u-s-devices-to-use-european-navigation-system-idUSKCN1MY2X6

2006 article – Galileo and amateur radio operations in 1260-1300 MHz
http://www.southgatearc.org/articles/galileo.htm

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ARISS and Amateur Radio in Raspberry Pi magazine article

Students programming the Astro Pi computers Credit: UK Space Agency (Max Alexander)

Radio amateur Dave Honess M6DNT is interviewed in the popular Raspberry Pi magazine MagPi about “Taking Education to the Stars”.

The article, on pages 84/85 of issue 75 November 2018 MagPi, covers the educational role of the two Astro Pi units on the International Space Station.

Dave mentions Tim Peake KG5BVI / GB1SS and the work of ARISS – Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, saying:

“Radio remains the only way to communicate with all our spacecraft throughout the solar system, and organisations like ARISS and local HAM radio clubs are, in my opinion, becoming more and more necessary to attract new talent.”

Download the Free PDF of MagPi magazine from
https://www.raspberrypi.org/magpi-issues/MagPi75.pdf

David Honess M6DNT with both ISS Astro Pi computers

David Honess M6DNT with both ISS Astro Pi computers

In 2017 Dave Honess M6DNT and Tim Peake KG5BVI / GB1SS were inducted into the prestigious CQ Amateur Radio Hall of Fame for their educational work in the ISS Astro Pi program and ARISS, Dave said:
“I was really surprised when I heard I’d been inducted into the Hall of Fame, especially alongside Tim! Thank you to CQ magazine for the honour.”

https://amsat-uk.org/2017/05/19/cq-mag-honors-astro-pi-britons/

Dave Honess M6DNT https://twitter.com/dave_spice

ARISS http://www.ariss.org/contact-the-iss.html

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ESEO’s Educational Story Continues

Happy ESEO students and AMSAT-UK members

Happy ESEO students and AMSAT-UK members

ESA reports the European Student Earth Orbiter (ESEO) has concluded its test campaign. The ESEO student teams gathered in the Netherlands, October 18, 2018 for a last precious lesson before the satellite is launched

ESEO satellite in the anechoic chamber at the ESTEC test facilities, in the Netherlands

ESEO satellite in the anechoic chamber at the ESTEC test facilities, in the Netherlands

ESEO carries an amateur radio 1260 to 145 MHz FM transponder and a 1k2 and 4k8 BPSK telemetry beacon developed by AMSAT-UK members.

The satellite has been at ESA’s ESTEC test facilities, in the Netherlands, where it completed the last steps of a thorough satellite test campaign which had started in August 2018 at SITAEL’s facility in Mola di Bari, Italy.

Learning by doing has already proven an amazing experience for the ten university student teams from different European universities who have designed and built the instruments and several key subsystems of the ESEO satellite.

On October 18, at a dedicated workshop, the ESEO students had the additional chance to hear first-hand what it takes to run a satellite test campaign – trouble shooting included!

“In the space sector no satellite could ever be launched without a thorough tests campaign”, said Piero Galeone, coordinating the ESA Academy programme of which ESEO is a part. “The reason is that – as perfect as your satellite design and manufacturing process can be – the devil always hides in the details. If there is anything to be fixed, you want to know it and correct it before the satellite flies on its orbit hundreds kilometres from the surface of the Earth, beyond the reach of any engineer’s hands”.

Read the full ESA story at
http://www.esa.int/Education/ESEO/Learning_from_real-life_experience_-_ESEO_s_educational_story_continues

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LO-94 spacecraft signal decoded after bouncing off Moon

 

SSDV image of Moon and Earth taken by LO94 (DSLWP-B) - Credit Cees Bassa

SSDV image of Moon and Earth taken by LO94 (DSLWP-B) – Credit Cees Bassa

Daniel Estévez EA4GPZ / M0HXM reports decoding a JT4G amateur radio signal from the LO-94 (DSLWP-B) spacecraft that was reflected off the Moon.

Daniel says “JT4G is a digital mode designed for Earth-Moon-Earth microwave communications, so it is tolerant to high Doppler spreads. However, the reflections of the [DSLWP-B] B0 transmitter at 435.4 MHz, which contained the JT4G transmissions, were very weak, so I had not attempted to decode the JT4G Moonbounce signal.”

However, by analysing a recording made on October 19, 2018 at 17:53:35 GMT he was able to decode one of the five JT4G transmissions in the recording.

Read his blog post at https://destevez.net/2018/10/dslwp-b-jt4g-decoded-via-moonbounce/

Also see Geometry for DSLWP-B Moonbounce
https://destevez.net/2018/10/geometry-for-dslwp-b-moonbounce/

The DSLWP amateur radio satellites built by students from the Harbin Institute of Technology was launched to Lunar orbit on May 20, 2018
https://amsat-uk.org/2018/05/19/dslwp-satellites-lunar-orbit/

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UKube-1 Falls Silent

UKube-1 in flight configuration in the cleanroom at Clyde Space Ltd – Credit Steve Greenland 2M0SCG

UKube-1, the UK Space Agency’s first CubeSat, was launched into space in July 2014. It completed its successful nominal mission fourteen month later in September 2015.

Since that date, for the past three years, the FUNcube based payload has continued to provide a transponder for use by radio amateurs and, additionally, 30+ channels of real time telemetry for STEM outreach and for use by schools and colleges. These downlinks have operated continuously on the 145 MHz band and more than 450 stations have supported this ongoing activity. They have uplinked the telemetry data to the FUNcube Data Warehouse where it is stored and available for research.

Just before midnight (UTC) on Thursday 18th October, the Warehouse received a data frame from KB6LTY, Christy Hunter in California. This is the last record of signals being received from the spacecraft and since that date, careful observations have failed to detect any signals from either of the transmitters carried by the spacecraft.

An early analysis of the last telemetry received has not shown any obvious anomalies, but this work continues.

Although it is obviously sad for both the amateur and educational worlds to lose such a valuable resource, both AO73-FUNcube 1 and EO88-Nayif 1 continue to operate nominally and JY1SAT and ESEO are expected to launch before the end of 2018.

UKube-1 https://amsat-uk.org/satellites/communications/ukube-1/

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