MOST DISTANT X-RAY JET DISCOVERED

The most distant jet ever observed was discovered in an image of a quasar made by NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory.

Extending more than 100,000 light-years from the supermassive black hole powering the quasar, the jet of high-energy particles provides astronomers with information about the intensity of the cosmic microwave background radiation 12 billion years ago.
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LIGHT-EMITTING DIODE TECHNOLOGY BRINGS RELIEF

A nurse holds a strange-looking device, moving it slowly toward a young patient’s face. The note-card-sized device is covered with glowing red lights, but as it comes closer, the youngster shows no fear. He’s hopeful this painless procedure using an array of lights will help ease or prevent some of the pain and discomfort associated with cancer treatment.
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UO-14 Satellite Declared Dead

The UO-14 Amateur Radio satellite has been declared officially dead after nearly 14 years in orbit, the Mission Control Centre at the Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) Center for Satellite Engineering Research reported November 11. AMSAT-UK Chairman Martin Sweeting, G3YJO, said one of the NiCad battery cells became exhausted, which caused UO-14’s transmitter to shut down due to undervoltage.

The popular and heavily used FM satellite quit working in August. Ground controller Chris Jackson, G7UPN, was able to reset the satellite at one time, but he later determined that UO-14 had suffered a primary power system failure.
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VISITOR CENTER UNVEILS “ADVENTURES IN FLIGHT”

NASA’s Langley Research Center visitor center in Hampton, Va., is celebrating the centennial of flight by unveiling a new state-of-the-art, interactive gallery. The one million-cubic-foot “Adventures in Flight” in the Virginia Air & Space Center (VASC) chronicles the history of aviation, and NASA’s contributions to flight.
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ANCIENT RIVERS ON MARS

Newly seen details in a fan-shaped apron of debris on Mars may help settle a decades-long debate about whether the planet had long-lasting rivers instead of just brief, intense floods.

Pictures from NASA’s Mars Global Surveyor orbiter show eroded ancient deposits of transported sediment long since hardened into interweaving, curved ridges of layered rock. Scientists interpret some of the curves as traces of ancient meanders made in a sedimentary fan as flowing water changed its course over time.
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