Hot Jupiter KELT-16b offers unique opportunity for research

(Phys.org)—A large international team of researchers has found that a hot Jupiter called KELT-16b is likely to offer a unique opportunity for research for many years to come. In their paper published in The Astronomical Journal, the team describes known characteristics of the exoplanet and why they believe it offers an opportunity to learn more about several aspects of exoplanet characteristics and development.

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Results from the NEOS experiment on sterile neutrinos differ partly from the theoretical expectations

Dubbed as "ghost particles," neutrinos have no electric charge and their masses are so tiny that they are difficult to observe. The sun, nuclear reactors, supernovae explosions create them, when their nuclei are going through a radioactive decay, known as beta decay. The Center for Underground Physics, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) led the Neutrino Experiment for Oscillation at Short Baseline (NEOS) to study the most elusive neutrinos, the so-called 'sterile neutrinos'. Their results are now available in the journal Physical Review Letters.

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Amazon River no younger than 9 million years, new study shows

Researchers from the University of Amsterdam (UvA) and the University of Brasilia (Brazil) have determined the age of the formation of the Amazon River at 9.4 to 9 million years ago (Ma) with data that convincingly refutes substantial younger estimates. Their results are published as early view in the journal Global and Planetary Change.

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Zinc regulates the storage and release of neurotransmitters

Zinc is a vital micronutrient involved in many cellular processes: For example, in learning and memory processes, it plays a role that is not yet understood. By using nanoelectrochemical measurements, Swedish researchers have made progress toward understanding by demonstrating that zinc influences the release of messenger molecules. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, zinc changes the number of messenger molecules stored in vesicles and the dynamics of their release from the cell.

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Political polarization? Don’t blame the web, study says

A study by a Brown University economist has found that recent growth in political polarization is largest for demographic groups in which individuals are least likely to use the internet and social media—a finding that suggests the internet is not the most significant driver of rising polarization, despite the popular narrative that the web is to blame.

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