Wireless device can see through walls to detect walking speed

A growing body of research suggests that your walking speed could be a strong predictor of health issues like cognitive decline, falls, and even certain cardiac or pulmonary diseases. A new device that can measure the walking speed of multiple people with 95 to 99 percent accuracy using wireless signals.

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Team discovers a new invasive clam in the US

They found it in the Illinois River near the city of Marseilles, Ill., about 80 miles west of Lake Michigan -- a strange entry point for an invasive Asian clam. The scientists who found it have no idea how it got there. But the discovery -- along with genetic tests that confirm its uniqueness -- means that a new species or 'form' of invasive clam has made its official debut in North America.

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The science behind making the perfect pitch

Applied mathematicians used mathematical models to figure out the best strategies to throw something at a target. The team found that while underhand throws are best for reaching a target close by and above the shoulder, overhand throws are more accurate for targets below the shoulder -- like a wastepaper basket -- and are more forgiving to errors over long distances.

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Gene editing strategy eliminates HIV-1 infection in live animals

A permanent cure for HIV infection remains elusive due to the virus's ability to hide away in latent reservoirs. But now, scientists show that they can excise HIV DNA from the genomes of living animals to eliminate further infection.

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Clouds ‘Roll’ Over Pacific Atolls

Areas near the equator are frequently cloudy, obscuring the view of Earth’s surface from space. April 7, 2017, was no different. On that day, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite captured this natural-color image of clouds over the Gilbert Islands.

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High-Contrast Imaging of Epsilon Eridani with Ground-Based Instruments

Abstract: Epsilon Eridani is one of the nearest solar-type stars. Its proximity and relatively young age allow high-contrast imaging observations to achieve sensitivities to planets at narrow separations down to an inner radius of approximately 5 AU. Previous observational studies of the system report a dust disk with asymmetric morphology as well as a giant planet with large orbital eccentricity, which may require another massive companion to induce the peculiar morphology and to enhance the large orb...

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