Gardening worms and climate change undermine natural coastal protection

Dikes could be lower if they are protected against the waves by grassy marshes. But the protective salt marsh grass is struggling to stay alive, and this is not only due to increasingly stronger waves in the face of climate change. Another serious threat to marshes is caused by ragworms: sophisticated gardeners were discovered to turn inedible, tough grass seeds into succulent, nutritious sprouts in their burrows. While the sprout-growing worms thrive on this superfood diet, their cultivation techniques prevent many seeds from growing into salt marsh vegetation, thus undermining the use of salt marshes for 'natural' coastal protection. This finding could help to outsmart the ragworms and make managing salt marshes more effective. Instead of planting seeds, successful restoration of marshes could be jump started by planting bigger plants,which are not eaten by the worms.

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Seasonal Variability of Saturn’s Tropospheric Temperatures, Winds and Para-H2 from Cassini Far-IR Spectroscopy

Abstract: Far-IR 16-1000 micrometer spectra of Saturn's hydrogen-helium continuum measured by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) are inverted to construct a near-continuous record of upper tropospheric (70-700 mbar) temperatures and para-H2 fraction as a function of latitude, pressure and time for a third of a saturnian year (2004-2014, from northern winter to northern spring). The thermal field reveals evidence of reversing summertime asymmetries superimposed onto the belt/zone structure...

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Impact of wobbly bridges and skyscrapers on human health tested in government-funded research center

The impact of vibrations from very tall buildings and wobbly bridges and floors on people's health and wellbeing is to be researched in a new £7.2 million government-funded national research facility.

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Microorganisms in the subsurface seabed on evolutionary standby

Researchers at the Center for Geomicrobiology at Aarhus University, Denmark, have sequenced the genomes of several microorganisms inhabiting the subsurface seabed in Aarhus Bay. The results reveal the extreme evolutionary regime controlling microbial life in the deep biosphere.

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Twitter and emergency retweets in times of disaster

Twitter and other social media tools are commonly used around the world. Now, many government and not-for-profit organizations have a presence on at least one of these systems and use them in various ways to share information about their activities and engage with people.

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Opening of Swarm and CryoSat Science Meetings

Scientists convened in Banff, Canada on 20 March 2017 to discuss the latest results coming from the three-satellite Swarm mission on Earth’s magnetic field, as well as new information on the planet’s changing ice masses from the CryoSat satellite. Hosted by the Canadian Space Agency, the event also brought together the heads of the two largest Earth observation programmes in the world: from ESA and NASA.

Programme:

Welcome addresses by:
Sylvain Laporte, President of the Canadian Space Agency
Josef Aschbacher, Director of ESA’s Earth Observation Programmes
Michael Freilich, Director of NASA’s Earth Science Division
Professor Ed McCauley, Vice President of the University of Calgary
Followed by keynote addresses:
The Citizen Scientist - A New Era by Eric Franck Donovan
Understanding polar regions with CryoSat by Andrew Shepherd
The International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics by Michael Sideris

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Opening of Swarm and CryoSat Science Meetings

Scientists convened in Banff, Canada on 20 March 2017 to discuss the latest results coming from the three-satellite Swarm mission on Earth’s magnetic field, as well as new information on the planet’s changing ice masses from the CryoSat satellite. Hosted by the Canadian Space Agency, the event also brought together the heads of the two largest Earth observation programmes in the world: from ESA and NASA.

Programme:

Welcome addresses by:
Sylvain Laporte, President of the Canadian Space Agency
Josef Aschbacher, Director of ESA’s Earth Observation Programmes
Michael Freilich, Director of NASA’s Earth Science Division
Professor Ed McCauley, Vice President of the University of Calgary
Followed by keynote addresses:
The Citizen Scientist - A New Era by Eric Franck Donovan
Understanding polar regions with CryoSat by Andrew Shepherd
The International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics by Michael Sideris

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Sexual assault victimization disproportionately affects certain minority college students

Students who perceive that their college campus is more inclusive and welcoming of sexual- and gender-minority people have lower odds of being victims of sexual assault, according to a study. In a complementary study, the researchers found that some minority groups are at considerably higher risk for sexual assault in college than peers in majority groups.

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A 48-hour sexual ‘afterglow’ helps to bond partners over time

Sex plays a central role in reproduction, and it can be pleasurable, but new findings suggest that it may serve an additional purpose: bonding partners together. A study of newlywed couples indicates that partners experience a sexual 'afterglow' that lasts for up to two days, and this afterglow is linked with relationship quality over the long term.

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