Battery can be recharged with carbon dioxide

(Phys.org)—Researchers have developed a type of rechargeable battery called a flow cell that can be recharged with a water-based solution containing dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted from fossil fuel power plants. The device works by taking advantage of the CO2 concentration difference between CO2 emissions and ambient air, which can ultimately be used to generate electricity.

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Orexin as a potential drug for treating septic shock

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition due to excessive immune responses to infection that damages the patient's own tissues and organs. In septic shock, the severest stage of sepsis, the blood pressure drops to a dangerously low level, often leading to multiple organ failure and death. To date, there is no effective therapy yet available for septic shock. Recent findings may be a breakthrough in developing a silver bullet for the treatment of septic shock.

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Most stretchable elastomer for 3-D printing

Researchers have developed a family of highly stretchable and UV curable (SUV) elastomers that can be stretched by up to 1100%, and are suitable for UV curing based 3-D printing techniques. Using high resolution 3-D printing with the SUV elastomer compositions enables the direct creation of complex 3-D lattices or hollow structures that exhibit extremely large deformation. Fabrication time for such SUV elastomers is also greatly reduced.

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Less driving linked to a decrease in roadway fatalities

A new study shows that a significant decrease in automobile travel from 2003-2014 correlated with a decrease in the number of crash deaths, with the largest reduction among young men. The study also discovered that at the same time, there was no increase in how active Americans were, meaning physical activity did not replace driving for many people.

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In-cell molecular sieve from protein crystal

Scientists have applied rational crystal design to create protein crystals with extended porous network to accumulate exogenous molecules inside living cells. This work lays a foundation for engineering of stable self-assembling crystalline porous materials which can concentrate and preserve bioactive substances in various cell types.

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