Students in Ham Radio Buildathon

Footage and interviews of students involved in the Sandringham School Space Festival amateur radio buildathon! They built their own working receivers in just a few hours!

Watch Buildathon (Making a Radio) #SANDspace

Sandringham School Space Festival Events
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B1uGINiJk1_CczF5YUw2bHd1S28/view

You can listen to the Sandringham Scoool contact with Tim Peake on the ISS at 0847 GMT on Friday, January 8, either online or by using a ham radio tuned to 145.800 MHz FM.
http://amsat-uk.org/2016/01/05/iss-school-contact-how-to-get-involved/

Huffington Post report: Schoolgirl Is Going To Operate A Radio Station So She Can Call Tim Peake From Earth
http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2016/01/05/this-schoolgirl-is-going-to-operate-a-radio-station-and-call-tim-peake-from-earth_n_8915462.html

ARISS contact planned for school in St. Albans
http://amsat-uk.org/2016/01/05/ariss-contact-planned-for-school-in-st-albans/

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NASA’s CORAL Campaign Will Raise Reef Studies to a New Level

A new three-year NASA field expedition gets underway this year that will use advanced instruments on airplanes and in the water to survey more of the world’s coral reefs in far greater detail than has ever been assessed before. The COral Reef Airborne Laboratory (CORAL) will measure the condition of these threatened ecosystems and create a unique d

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NASA Awards Contract for NASA Enterprise Applications Competency Center Operations

NASA has awarded a contract to Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) of McLean, Virginia, to provide all services necessary to operate the NASA Enterprise Applications Competency Center (NEACC).

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SECAF visits 24th Air Force

Secretary of the Air Force Deborah Lee James visited 24th Air Force - AFCYBER at Joint Base San Antonio - Lackland Jan 4, 2016. James received briefings from Maj. Gen. Ed Wilson, 24th Air Force commander, and Maj. Gen. B.J. Shwedo, 25th Air Force commander, and discussed a series of cyber and global ISR initiatives focused on industry partnerships and innovation.
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Space Station Flyover of British Columbia’s Coast Mountains

ESA astronaut Tim Peake (@astro_timpeake) took this photograph over the west coast of Canada from the International Space Station on Dec. 31, 2015, and shared it with his Twitter followers on Jan. 5, writing, "I was lucky enough to fly a helicopter in these Rocky Mountains once – I’m a bit higher this time! #Principia"

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Cavalier AFS significant link to missile warning/space defense

Once a major piece of U.S. nuclear defenses during the Cold War, Cavalier Air Force Station continues to be a significant link in the nation's missile warning and space defense scheme.

The 10th Space Warning Squadron is a geographically separated unit of the 21st Space Wing at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado Springs, Colo. Cavalier Air Force Station, N.D. is about 15 miles south of the Canadian border. The installation initially provided the first and only ballistic missile defense of ICBM fields in the northern U.S. Following the Strategic Arms Limitations Treaty II that mission was terminated. Soon after, new dual missions of providing missile warning and supporting space surveillance began. The Perimeter Acquisition Radar Attack Characterization System at Cavalier AFS is the only Safeguard component that was not deactivated.
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Taking down Envisat model

The Netherlands’ Noordwijk coast lost a local landmark recently as a full-scale model of Europe’s largest ever environmental satellite was removed from the visitor centre for ESA’s technical heart.

The eight-tonne Envisat satellite was launched in 2002. Carrying 10 instruments, the lorry-sized satellite spent a decade monitoring the terrestrial environment, paving the way for Europe’s current Sentinel series.

This metal and plastic replica was installed outside Space Expo – the visitor centre for ESA’s ESTEC technical centre – in July 1999, but it eventually fell prey to the terrestrial environment: years of exposure to North Sea winds led to pieces dropping off.

The decision to dismantle it was taken to prevent it becoming a danger to the public.

The operation began with workers on a cherry picker pulling the main body apart. Then cutting torches split its support structure and solar wings, with an articulated hauler used to pull everything down. The work took place on 18 December.

The actual Envisat – drifting in its 800 km-altitude orbit since contact was lost in 2012 – is itself due for disposal. It is the planned target of ESA’s proposed e.Deorbit mission, intended to pioneer the concept of space debris removal.

Due for launch in 2021, e.Deorbit will rendezvous with the lost satellite and then secure it for a controlled atmospheric reentry.

Space Expo might have lost one attraction, but new ones are arriving regularly – an Ariane 5 Vulcain engine is among its latest acquisitions. Visitors can also book guided tours of the adjoining ESTEC establishment.

A replacement satellite replica is planned to be installed in Envisat’s place, but its identity is yet to be announced.

Click here to visit Original posting

Taking down Envisat model

The Netherlands’ Noordwijk coast lost a local landmark recently as a full-scale model of Europe’s largest ever environmental satellite was removed from the visitor centre for ESA’s technical heart.

The eight-tonne Envisat satellite was launched in 2002. Carrying 10 instruments, the lorry-sized satellite spent a decade monitoring the terrestrial environment, paving the way for Europe’s current Sentinel series.

This metal and plastic replica was installed outside Space Expo – the visitor centre for ESA’s ESTEC technical centre – in July 1999, but it eventually fell prey to the terrestrial environment: years of exposure to North Sea winds led to pieces dropping off.

The decision to dismantle it was taken to prevent it becoming a danger to the public.

The operation began with workers on a cherry picker pulling the main body apart. Then cutting torches split its support structure and solar wings, with an articulated hauler used to pull everything down. The work took place on 18 December.

The actual Envisat – drifting in its 800 km-altitude orbit since contact was lost in 2012 – is itself due for disposal. It is the planned target of ESA’s proposed e.Deorbit mission, intended to pioneer the concept of space debris removal.

Due for launch in 2021, e.Deorbit will rendezvous with the lost satellite and then secure it for a controlled atmospheric reentry.

Space Expo might have lost one attraction, but new ones are arriving regularly – an Ariane 5 Vulcain engine is among its latest acquisitions. Visitors can also book guided tours of the adjoining ESTEC establishment.

A replacement satellite replica is planned to be installed in Envisat’s place, but its identity is yet to be announced.

Click here to visit Original posting