Victorians were “happier” than we are now, finds CAGE research

New research by the University of Warwick's Centre for Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE) and the Social Market Foundation shows that levels of happiness appear to have been highest during the Victorian era, and during the 20th Century peaked during 1957, a level to which they have never returned.

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Become a citizen scientist and help preserve California’s biodiversity

Would you like to become a volunteer citizen scientist helping to document and analyze California's rich biodiversity? If so, you can be among 1,000 volunteers who will collect 18,000 samples of soil and aquatic sediment from across the state through a new University of California program called CALeDNA that intends to revolutionize conservation in California by the end of this year.

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Become a citizen scientist and help preserve California’s biodiversity

Would you like to become a volunteer citizen scientist helping to document and analyze California's rich biodiversity? If so, you can be among 1,000 volunteers who will collect 18,000 samples of soil and aquatic sediment from across the state through a new University of California program called CALeDNA that intends to revolutionize conservation in California by the end of this year.

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Comparison of the Effects of Velocity and Range Triggers on Trajectory Dispersions for the Mars 2020 Mission

Abstract: Mars 2020, the next planned U.S. rover mission to land on Mars, is based on the design of the successful 2012 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. Mars 2020 retains most of the entry, descent, and landing (EDL) sequences of MSL, including the closed-loop entry guidance scheme based on the Apollo guidance algorithm. However, unlike MSL, Mars 2020 will trigger the parachute deployment and descent sequence on range trigger rather than the previously used velocity trigger. This difference will ...

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Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequisite for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

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Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequisite for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

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