MAI-75 ISS SSTV Video

John Brier KG4AKV

John Brier KG4AKV

John Brier KG4AKV has released a video showing reception of the MAI-75 experiment Slow Scan TV transmissions from the International Space Station.

This is one of two rare MAI-75 passes over North America. The other is in Video #3 in this series (see link below). It’s rare because the MAI-75 event only took place for a few hours of Thursday and Friday during the week long event, and almost all of the passes didn’t go over North America, so getting it was really special. This was a great way to round out the April 2016 ISS SSTV week long event! I love this SuitSat image!

Oh yeah! This was shot partially with a GoPro! Enjoy the views.

Eventually I hope to make a time lapse of all the ISS SSTV images I received during this event, but my next video will be of an SO-50 pass where I made six contacts, five of which were back to back.

Watch Spacesuit MAI-75 Image! – Last Pass of April 2016 ISS SSTV Event – Video #4

New videos every Wednesday!
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJDdMdjxwFsjdzhXQFHVk2g/videos
https://twitter.com/johnbrier

ISS Slow Scan TV https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

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NASA Joins White House in Addressing Gender Equality Achievements, Challenges

NASA will host a conversation from 1 to 3 p.m. Wednesday, June 15, at NASA Headquarters in Washington on pathways for women and girls into science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) academic programs and careers. The event, Engaging Women and Girls in STEM through Data Science, will air on NASA Television and stream on the agency’s website.

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New Planet Is Largest Discovered That Orbits Two Suns

If you cast your eyes toward the constellation Cygnus, you’ll be looking in the direction of the largest planet yet discovered around a double-star system. It’s too faint to see with the naked eye, but a team led by astronomers from Goddard and San Diego State University, used NASA's Kepler Space Telescope to identify the new planet.

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New Planet Is Largest Discovered That Orbits Two Suns

If you cast your eyes toward the constellation Cygnus, you’ll be looking in the direction of the largest planet yet discovered around a double-star system. It’s too faint to see with the naked eye, but a team led by astronomers from Goddard and San Diego State University, used NASA's Kepler Space Telescope to identify the new planet.

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NASA Scientist Presents “The Juno Mission to Jupiter” at the Library of Congress

The public is invited to a free talk called “The Juno Mission to Jupiter,” presented by John (Jack) Connerney, at the Mary Pickford Theater (3rd Floor, James Madison Building, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.) on Thursday, June 23, from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. EDT.

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NASA Scientist Presents “The Juno Mission to Jupiter” at the Library of Congress

The public is invited to a free talk called “The Juno Mission to Jupiter,” presented by John (Jack) Connerney, at the Mary Pickford Theater (3rd Floor, James Madison Building, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.) on Thursday, June 23, from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. EDT.

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Sentinel-1B prepares for liftoff (April 2016)

This timelapse video shows Sentinel-1B, from final preparations to liftoff on a Soyuz launcher from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana, on 25 April 2016 at 21:02 GMT (23:02 CEST).

With the Sentinel-1 mission designed as a two-satellite constellation, Sentinel-1B will join its identical twin, Sentinel-1A, which was launched two years ago from Kourou. Both satellites carry an advanced radar that images Earth’s surface through cloud and rain regardless of whether it is day or night. By orbiting 180° apart, global coverage and data delivery are optimised for the environmental monitoring Copernicus programme. The mission provides radar imagery for a multitude of services and applications to improve everyday life and understand our changing planet.

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GB1SS: schools speaking to Tim Peake

Sandringham students talk to Tim Peake GB1SS using amateur radio

Sandringham students talk to Tim Peake GB1SS using amateur radio – BBC TV screenshot

The ten school contacts with Tim Peake on the ISS during his Principia mission have inspired thousands of young people and introduced them to amateur radio in a new and exciting way. A new RSGB video celebrates these historic events and the range of linked activities the schools have enjoyed.

Students at Derby High School Bury use amateur radio to link up with Tim Peake

Students at Derby High School Bury used amateur radio to link up with Tim Peake

Beginning with the exhilaration of the launch, it follows the competition for schools to host the ARISS contacts, and showcases the variety of science, technology, engineering, maths (STEM) and arts activities that helped pupils to understand more about space and amateur radio.

The contacts themselves, often led by newly-licensed pupils, were the successful culmination of many months of work and anticipation. We congratulate everyone involved and hope you enjoy our celebration.

Watch GB1SS: schools speaking to Tim Peake

ARISS UK videos https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQS-yDk7PdE9cRv4MNu8pCw/videos

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station http://ariss.org/
Twitter https://twitter.com/ARISS_status

ARISS Principia site https://principia.ariss.org/

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Find an amateur radio training course near you https://thersgb.org/services/coursefinder/

A free booklet is available aimed at introducing newcomers to the hobby that can also be used as a handy reference while getting started, see
http://rsgb.org/main/get-started-in-amateur-radio/alex-discovers-amateur-radio-2/

AMSAT-UK https://amsat-uk.org/
Twitter https://twitter.com/AmsatUK
Facebook https://facebook.com/AmsatUK
YouTube https://youtube.com/AmsatUK

Beccy Bowen 2W0YLL led the contact between Powys school students and Tim Peake GB1SS

Beccy Bowen 2W0YLL (right) led the contact between Powys school students and Tim Peake GB1SS

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Young star offers a glimpse of the Sun’s past

It may look like a star, it may be called a star, but it does not yet generate energy like a normal star. This is because this star is still being formed.

It offers a fascinating glimpse into our own past because our Sun began its life as such a ‘T Tauri’ star some 4.6 billion years ago.

Located 1800 light-years away in the constellation Cygnus, V1331 Cyg was originally nothing but a diffuse cloud of gas in space. Slowly over time, gravity has pulled it together, but the process is not yet over. V1331 is not yet fully formed and so is still larger than it will eventually be once gravity has done its job. It is shining because of the energy being released as it shrinks.

Eventually, it will be compact enough that the temperature in its centre will ignite nuclear fusion. Hydrogen will then be transformed into helium and this will release the torrents of energy that will make V1331 Cyg shine for billions of years as a bona fide star.

The swathes of dust that surround the star are the remnants of the cloud from which it condensed. Often, this circumstellar disc obscures our view of the young stellar object but, by chance, we happen be looking down on the rotational pole of the star, so it appears as a dazzling ‘searchlight’ beam.

This circumstellar disc is the site where planets may be forming, and in the case of V1331 Cyg time is running out. A T Tauri star produces a strong ‘wind’ of atomic particles that dissipates the disc, bringing planet formation to an end.

The image was taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and is a combination of three exposures taken at different wavelengths. These almost correspond to human eyesight: blue, green and, instead of red light that our eyes would see, Hubble used near-infrared.

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