Endeavour’s Crew Awake to Begin Flight Day 13

The crews of space shuttle Endeavour and Expedition 28 woke at 8:01 p.m. EDT to the song “Will You Carry Me?” performed by Michael FitzPatrick, played for the entire crew. FitzPatrick has been an Electrical, Environmental, Consumables, and Mechanical flight controller at NASA's Johnson Space Center for more than 20 years and supported 80 missions.

Today the crew will be performing maintenance on the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly, reconfiguring the spacesuits from yesterday's spacewalk, and transferring cargo between the shuttle and station.

Commander Mark Kelly, Pilot Greg Johnson and Expedition 28 Flight Engineer Ron Garan will participate from space in a community gathering in Tucson at 10:16 p.m. They will answer questions about their mission from a gathering of 100 local public school students from the area, the University of Arizona and NASA Space Grant partners.

At 8:46 a.m. Saturday, Johnson will talk to reporters from television stations in Michigan and Ohio.

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Endeavour’s Thermal Protection System Cleared

Mission managers met this afternoon to discuss the data collected from late inspection of the shuttle’s Thermal Protection System (TPS). After reviewing the imagery obtained, managers cleared the TPS of any issues and gave a “go” for Endeavour and its crew to return to Earth.

Friday’s Mission Management Team briefing has been canceled.

Shuttle Endeavour’s first landing opportunity at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida is at 2:35 a.m. EDT on June 1.

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Fourth STS-134 Spacewalk Final One by Shuttle Astronauts

The seven-hour, 24-minute spacewalk completed by STS-134 astronauts Mike Fincke and Greg Chamitoff at 7:39 a.m. EDT was the final spacewalk conducted by space shuttle astronauts. It also was the last of the four spacewalks for the STS-134 mission, for a mission total of 28 hours, 44 minutes. The primary objectives for the spacewalk were accomplished, including stowing the 50-foot-long boom and adding a power and data grapple fixture to make it the Enhanced International Space Station Boom Assembly, available to extend the reach of the space station's robotic arm.

At 5:02 a.m., Fincke and Chamitoff surpassed the 1,000th hour astronauts and cosmonauts have spent spacewalking in support of space station assembly and maintenance. The milestone occurred four hours and 47 minutes into today's spacewalk, the 159th in support of station assembly and maintenance, totaling 1,002 hours, 37 minutes.

It was the 248th spacewalk U.S. astronauts have conducted and the 118th from space station airlocks.

It was Fincke's ninth spacewalk for a total time of 48 hours and 37 minutes; he is sixth on the all-time list. At about 8 p.m. this evening, he will become the U.S. astronaut who has spent the most number of days in space, surpassing Peggy Whitson's record of 377 days in space.

It was Chamitoff's second spacewalk for a total time of 13 hours and 43 minutes.

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Astronauts Complete Final STS-134 Spacewalk; Briefing Time Changes

Astronauts Mike Fincke and Greg Chamitoff completed a seven-hour, 24-minute spacewalk at 7:39 a.m. EDT. The primary objectives for the spacewalk were accomplished, including stowing the 50-foot-long boom and adding a power and data grapple fixture to make it the Enhanced International Space Station Boom Assembly, available to extend the reach of the space station's robotic arm.

Today's mission status briefing now is scheduled to begin at 9:30 a.m. NASA Television will air the briefing with International Space Station Lead Flight Director Derek Hassmann and STS-134 Lead Spacewalk Officer Allison Bolinger, who will discuss today's spacewalk.

This was the final spacewalk conducted by space shuttle astronauts. It also was the last of the four spacewalks for the STS-134 mission, for a mission total of 28 hours, 44 minutes.

At 5:02 a.m., Fincke and Chamitoff surpassed the 1,000th hour astronauts and cosmonauts have spent spacewalking in support of space station assembly and maintenance. The milestone occurred four hours and 47 minutes into today's spacewalk, the 159th in support of station assembly and maintenance, totaling 1,002 hours, 37 min.

It was the 248th spacewalk U.S. astronauts have conducted and the 118th from space station airlocks.

It was Fincke's ninth spacewalk for a total time of 48 hours and 37 minutes; he is sixth on the all-time list. At about 8 p.m. this evening, he will become the U.S. astronaut who has spent the most number of days in space, surpassing Peggy Whitson's record of 377 days in space.

It was Chamitoff's second spacewalk for a total time of 13 hours and 43 minutes.

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Astronauts Complete Final STS-134 Spacewalk

Astronauts Mike Fincke and Greg Chamitoff completed a seven hour, 24 minute spacewalk at 7:39 a.m. EDT. The primary objectives for the spacewalk were accomplished, including stowing the 50-foot long boom and adding a power and data grapple fixture to make it the Enhanced International Space Station Boom Assembly, available to extend the reach of the space station's robotic arm.

This was the final spacewalk conducted by space shuttle astronauts. It also was the last of the four spacewalks for the STS-134 mission, for a mission total of 28 hours, 44 minutes.

At 5:02 a.m., Fincke and Chamitoff surpassed the 1,000th hour astronauts and cosmonauts have spent spacewalking in support of space station assembly and maintenance. The milestone occurred four hours and 47 minutes into today's spacewalk, the 159th in support of station assembly and maintenance, totaling 1,002 hours, 37 min.

It was the 248th spacewalk U.S. astronauts have conducted and the 118th from space station airlocks.

It was Fincke's ninth spacewalk for a total time of 48 hours and 37 minutes; he is sixth on the all-time list. At about 8 p.m. this evening, he will become the U.S. astronaut who has spent the most number of days in space, surpassing Peggy Whitson's record of 377 days in space.

It was Chamitoff's second spacewalk for a total time of 13 hours and 43 minutes.

NASA Television will air a mission status briefing with International Space Station Lead Flight Director Derek Hassmann and STS-134 Lead Spacewalk Officer Allison Bolinger to discuss the spacewalk. The briefing is scheduled to begin at 9 a.m.

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Final Spacewalk Nearing End

Astronaut Mike Fincke successfully released three bolts on a spare arm for Dextre, the Canadian Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator. He did make use of a specially designed pry rod.

Meanwhile, Greg Chamitoff recharged his oxygen then tightened a loose tether on Dextre.

The spacewalkers then traversed to the ExPRESS Logistics Carrier #3 to take some photos of an experiment on that platform. The Space Test Program-Houston 3 payload, is a complement of four individual experiments that will test concepts in low-Earth orbit for long duration.

They now will clean up work areas and head back to the Quest airlock to conclude the final spacewalk made by space shuttle astronauts.

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Power and Data Grapple Fixture Connected to Boom

Greg Chamitoff, with assistance from Mike Fincke, released the six bolts holding the electrical flight grapple fixture to the space station boom and cut the grapple's cable. Using six bolts, Chamitoff then installed an adapter assembly on the boom. The pair then slid the power and data grapple fixture into place on it and secured it with four bolts. Now that the power and data grapple fixture has been added, the boom will be known as the Enhanced International Space Station Boom Assembly. The 50-foot boom now can be connected to the Canadarm, the space station's robotic arm, to double its reach.

The crews are cleaning up from the activity. The spacewalk timeline called for Fincke to stow the electrical flight grapple fixture they removed in Endeavour's cargo bay. However, in the interest of time, the spacewalkers will instead return the fixture to the airlock with them at the conclusion of today's spacewalk.�

The next task will be to work on a spare arm for Dextre, the Canadian Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator. The arm was delivered on the ExPRESS Logistics Carrier 3, where three expandable diameter fixture bolts held it in place for launch. Fincke and Chamitoff will release each of the bolts, making use of a specially designed pry rod, if required.

Mission Control also notified the spacewalkers that they would like to extend the spacewalk to approximately 7 hours and 30 minutes to allow them to accomplish the primary planned activities. Chamitoff will need to recharge his oxygen. He will skip a 15-minute task to inspect and perhaps tighten a tether on Dextre that has loosened some over time. If time allows, that task could be added back at the end of the spacewalk.

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Station Spacewalking Milestone Reached

Astronauts and cosmonauts have now spent 1,000 hours spacewalking for assembly and maintenance of the International Space Station. Spacewalkers Mike Fincke and Greg Chamitoff surpassed the 1,000th hour 4 hours and 47 minutes into today's spacewalk, at 5:02 a.m. EDT. It is the final spacewalk of this mission and the last ever by space shuttle astronauts.

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