Pressure tuned magnetism paves the way for novel electronic devices

Using very sensitive magnetic probes, an international team of researchers has found surprising evidence that magnetism which emerges at the interfaces between non-magnetic oxide thin layers can be easily tuned by exerting tiny mechanical forces. This discovery provides a new and unexpected handle to control magnetism, thus enabling denser magnetic memory, and opens new and unexpected routes for developing novel oxide-based spintronic devices.

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Passive exposure alone can enhance the learning of foreign speech sounds

Ability to understand and subsequently speak a new language requires the ability to accurately discriminate speech sounds of a given language. When we start to learn a new language the differences between speech sounds can be very difficult to perceive. With enough active practice the ability to discriminate the speech sounds enhances.

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Advancing the description of ‘mysterious’ water to improve drug design

Interactions with water dominate how drug molecules bind to targets, but it's tricky to model these interactions, limiting the accuracy of drug design. Scientists have now described a novel approach to building a new description of water (known as a force field) and demonstrating its accuracy.

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Pressure tuned magnetism paves the way for novel electronic devices

Advances in the technology of material growth allow fabricating sandwiches of materials with atomic precision. The interface between the two materials can sometimes exhibit physical phenomena which do not exist in both parent materials. For example, a magnetic interface found between two non-magnetic materials. A new discovery, published today in Nature Physics, shows a new way of controlling this emergent magnetism which may be the basis for new types of magnetic electronic devices.

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