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Richard Meadows M0SBU reports two high altitude balloons carrying 434 MHz payloads will launch from Bristol on Monday, August 29. There will be Slow Scan Digital Video (SSDV) transmissions. We’re planning the first launch of ‘pico-pi’, our Raspberry Pi Zero … Continue reading

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NASA research mathematician Katherine Johnson is photographed at her desk at Langley Research Center. Born on Aug. 26, 1918, in White Sulphur Springs, WV, Johnson worked at Langley from 1953 until her retirement in 1986, making critical technical contr…

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SpaceX’s Dragon cargo spacecraft splashed down in the Pacific Ocean at 11:47 a.m. EDT Friday, Aug. 26, southwest of Baja California with more than 3,000 pounds of NASA cargo, science and technology demonstration samples from the International Space Sta…

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This image from the Sentinel-2A satellite captures Turkey’s Third Bosphorus Bridge on 8 February 2016.

The hybrid cable-stayed suspension bridge forms part of the ongoing 150 km-long Northern Marmara Highway project, and opened on 26 Augus…

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NASA has selected United Launch Services LLC of Centennial, Colorado, to provide launch services for a mission that will address high-priority science goals for the agency’s Journey to Mars.

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NASA has released a Cooperative Agreement Notice (CAN) – Cycle 2, for a second round of multi-institutional team-based proposals for researchers who wish to become participating members of its Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI).

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To celebrate the centennial of the U.S National Park Service, Expedition 48 Commander Jeff Williams of NASA has taken hundreds of images of national parks from his vantage point in low Earth orbit, aboard the International Space Station. Here, a series…

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Mutant soybeans planted as part of a campaign to support the development of ESA’s FLEX mission can be seen clearly as the bright blue strip in the centre of the image. The image was captured by the airborne HyPlant, which comprises two ‘imaging spectrometers’ – essentially cameras that see the reflected and the emitted light from the surface at different wavelengths. The mutant soybean plants only have 20% of the chlorophyll of ‘normal’ green plants. Such chlorophyll deficiency changes the properties of the leaves, which are a yellowy colour. As such, these mutant soybean leaves reflect much more sunlight than their green cousins, leaving the plant with less energy to photosynthesise. Although they have less energy, these mutants are surprisingly more efficient at fixing carbon dioxide from the air. Traditional satellite techniques rely on measuring aspects of reflected light to estimate plant productivity and cannot account for unusual coloured plants. ESA’s FLEX mission, however, will use a novel technique to map plant health. It will detect and measure the faint glow that plants give off as they photosynthesise, so non-green plants will be measured like normal green plants.

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On 19 February 2016 Rosetta’s instruments detected an outburst event from Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. The source was traced back to a location in the Atum region, on the comet’s large lobe, as indicated in this image.

The inset image was taken a few hours after the outburst by Rosetta’s NavCam and shows the approximate source location. The image at left was taken on 21 March 2015 and is shown for context, and so there are some differences in shadowing/illumination as a result of the images being acquired at very different times.

For more information see: Rosetta captures comet outburst

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A newly discovered, roughly Earth-sized planet orbiting our nearest neighboring star might be habitable.

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