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Secretary of the Air Force Deborah Lee James spoke to an audience of military and commercial space professionals, and space enthusiasts at the 31st Annual Space Symposium here.  Secretary James added to a familiar message.

"You might think I am here from our headquarters at the Pentagon to bring you the message that space is congested, contested and competitive.  I know you've heard that before and, yes, I am going to bring you that message because all of that is true," said Secretary James. "But I have an even bigger message today, it's a message of confidence.  Confidence that we, the United States of America working shoulder to shoulder with our allies and partners, will not be bested."
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The NASA Wallops Flight Facility Visitor Center will host an Astronomy Night & Hubble Space Telescope 25 Anniversary celebration from 7 – 9 p.m., Friday, April 24.

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In this Chandra image of ngc6388, researchers have found evidence that a white dwarf star may have ripped apart a planet as it came too close. When a star reaches its white dwarf stage, nearly all of the material from the star is packed inside a radius one hundredth that of the original star.

The destruction of a planet may sound like the stuff of science fiction, but a team of astronomers has found evidence that this may have happened in an ancient cluster of stars at the edge of the Milky Way galaxy.

Using several telescopes, including NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, researchers have found evidence that a white dwarf star – the dense core of a star like the Sun that has run out of nuclear fuel – may have ripped apart a planet as it came too close.

More information.

Image Credit: NASA

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NASA is exercising its second cost-plus-award-fee option to extend the period of performance with Jacobs Technology Inc. of Tullahoma, Tennessee, to provide test evaluation and support services at the agency’s White Sands Test Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico.

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In this Chandra image of ngc6388, researchers have found evidence that a white dwarf star may have ripped apart a planet as it came too close. When a star reaches its white dwarf stage, nearly all of the material from the star is packed inside a radius one hundredth that of the original star.

The destruction of a planet may sound like the stuff of science fiction, but a team of astronomers has found evidence that this may have happened in an ancient cluster of stars at the edge of the Milky Way galaxy.

Using several telescopes, including NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, researchers have found evidence that a white dwarf star – the dense core of a star like the Sun that has run out of nuclear fuel – may have ripped apart a planet as it came too close.

More information.

Image Credit: NASA

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One of the target plates from Rosetta’s Cometary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser (COSIMA), showing dust grains from comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, collected between 11 August and 12 December 2014.

The target plate measures 1cm across. Some of the particles are named by the COSIMA team.

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This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows an elliptical galaxy known as IC 2006. Massive elliptical galaxies like these are common in the modern Universe, but how they quenched their once furious rates of star formation is an astrophysical mystery.

Now, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) have revealed that three billion years after the Big Bang, these types of galaxies still made stars on their outskirts, but no longer in their interiors.

The quenching of star formation seems to have started in the cores of the galaxies and then spread to the outer parts.

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This single frame Rosetta navigation camera image of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko was taken on 15 April 2015 from a distance of 170 km from the comet centre. The image has a resolution of 14.5 m/pixel and measures 11.4 km across.

The original image and more information is available on the blog: CometWatch 15 April

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