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Pete M0PSX had the opportunity to talk about ARISS and amateur radio during a radio show aired on Basildon Hospital Radio and community station Gateway FM. The interview was broadcast on 1287 AM, 97.8 FM, via the patient bedside system … Continue reading

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Carole Cadwalladr writes in The Observer newspaper for Sunday, May 29 about the amateur radio contact between students at The King’s School GB1OSM, Ottery St Mary, Devon and Tim Peake GB1SS on the International Space Station. She says: A huge … Continue reading

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This young star is breaking out. Like a hatchling pecking through its shell, this particular stellar newborn is forcing its way out into the surrounding Universe.

The golden veil of light cloaks a young stellar object known only as IRAS 14…

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As part of ESA’s proposed Asteroid Impact Mission would come the Agency’s next landing on a small body since Rosetta’s Philae lander reached 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko in 2014.

In 2022 the Mascot-2 microlander would be deployed from the main AIM spacecraft to touch down on the approximately 170-m diameter ‘Didymoon’, in orbit around the larger 700-m diameter Didymos asteroid.

The 15 kg Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout-2 (Mascot-2) is building on the heritage of DLR’s Mascot-1 already flying on Japan’s Hayabusa-2. Launched in 2014, the latter will land on asteroid Ryugu in 2018.

Mascot-2 would be deployed from AIM at about 5 cm/s, and remain in contact with its mothership as it falls through a new inter-satellite communications system. Didymoon’s gravity levels will only be a few thousandths of Earth’s, so the landing would be relatively gentle, although multiple bounces may take place before it comes to rest.

Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) would help AIM to pinpoint its microlander’s resting place from orbit. In case of a landing in a non-illuminated area, a spring-like ‘mobility mechanism’ would let the microlander jump to another location. Onboard GNC ‘guidance navigation and control’ sensors would gather details of the landing both for scientific reasons and to determine the microlander’s orientation for deployment of the solar array to keep it supplied with sufficient power for several weeks of surface operations.

As well as a solar array, AIM would also deploy its low frequency radar LFR instrument, while cameras perform visible and thermal surface imaging. LFR would send radar signals right through the body, to be detected by AIM on Didymoon’s far side, to provide detailed subsurface soundings of an asteroid’s internal structure for the first time ever .

Then Mascot-2 would repeat these measurements after Didymoon has been impacted by the NASA’s DART (Double Asteroid Redirection Test) probe, to assess the extent of structural changes induced by this impact event. AIM and DART together are known as the Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment mission.

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In the run up to Asteroid Day on 30 June, this video details the micro-lander envisaged as part of ESA’s proposed Asteroid Impact Mission

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A timelapse video by European Space Agency astronaut Tim Peake taken during his six-month Principia mission on the International Space Station.
 
 The International Space Station travels at 28 800 km/h meaning that it only takes 90 minutes to circle Earth completely. Each orbit the Station moves around 2200 km to the West in relation to 90 minutes before.
 
 Astronauts use normal consumer digital cameras to take pictures in their spare time. Setting the camera to take an image every few seconds and then playing the images back quickly creates this timelapse effect.
 
 The British astronaut commented on this timelapse: “Venus rising behind the aurora. Timelapse video made by taking an image every second for around two and a half minutes”

More about the Principia mission: http://www.esa.int/Principia

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On May 19, 2016, students from Robertsville Middle School, Oak Ridge, Tennessee visited Marshall Space Flight Center and presented their CubeSat project results to NASA engineers. NASA Explores says: They had been tasked to design a 1U ‪CubeSat‬ with a … Continue reading

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NASA and Bigelow Aerospace will make a second attempt at 9 a.m. EDT Saturday, May 28, to expand the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM), currently attached to the International Space Station. NASA Television coverage will begin at 8:45 a.m.

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On April 21, 2016, ESA’s Education Office set a challenge for the worldwide radio amateur community to start listening out for three new orbiting CubeSats. The results have now been released. ESA’s Education Office published the transmission frequencies of the … Continue reading

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NASA has rescheduled today’s media teleconference, originally scheduled for noon EDT, to 2 p.m. for a discussion on the status of the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) installed on the International Space Station. The teleconference will stream live on the agency’s website.

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