Amateur satellite operation from Isle of Islay

Camb-Hams 2018 Isle of IslayThe AMSAT News Service reports members of Camb-Hams operating GS3PYE/P will be active on the amateur radio satellites from the Isle of Islay between May 13-18.

The Camb-Hams have been activating the Scottish Isles each year since 2008. As in the past, ten or more operators will be active on all bands and many modes from 4m to 80m, 2m & 70cm for Satellites and 2m & 23cm for EME.

The HF bands will be covered by four simultaneous stations while the 6m & 4m stations will have a great take-off towards the UK and Europe. All stations will be able to run at the full UK power limit. EME operations will use 150W to 55 elements on 23cm and 400W to 17 elements on 2m, primarily on JT65, but also available for CW skeds – if your station is big enough. Satellite operations on 2m & 70cm will use X-Quad antennas and a fully automatic Az/El tracking system.

Activity is planned on AO-7 (mode B), VO-52, FO-29, SO-50 & AO-73.

Most importantly, this is a group of good friends doing what they enjoy, so please give them a call and enjoy the trip with them. They will be active on the major social networks before, during and after the trip, you can check on their progress and interact with the operators via their blog or through Twitter, Facebook and YouTube [see links below]. Please check their Web page for details on how to arrange skeds on the more challenging bands, modes, VHF and EME.

QSL via OQRS (info on QRZ.com) or M0VFC direct or via bureau.

Camb-Hams
http://dx.camb-hams.com/
https://twitter.com/g3pye
https://facebook.com/CambHams
https://youtube.com/CambHams

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Linear transponder CubeSat to deploy from ISS

Masa JN1GKZ reports JAXA has announced three CubeSats, Irazu (Costa Rica), 1KUNS-PF (Kenya) and UBAKUSAT (Turkey)  will deploy from the International Space Station on Friday, May 11 between 1030-1040 GMT.

All the CubeSats carry amateur radio payloads, Irazu and 1KUNS-PF have telemetry beacons while UBAKUSAT carries a linear transponder for amateur radio SSB and CW communications in additional to CW and telemetry beacons.

The deployment will be broadcast live on YouTube, watch from 1000 GMT Friday, May 11.

Irazu is a 1U CubeSat developed by students at the Costa Rica Institute of Technology
Telemetry Beacon 436.500 MHz

1KUNS-PF is a 3U CubeSat developed by students at the University of Nairobi
Telemetry Beacon 9600bps 437.300 MHz
http://engineering.uonbi.ac.ke/sites/default/files/cae/engineering/engineering/1KUNS-PF_Cubesat_1.0_rev3.pdf

UBAKUSAT is a 3U CubeSat developed by students at the Istanbul Technical University
CW Beacon 437.225 MHz
Telemetry Beacon 437.325 MHz
Linear Transponder
– 435.200-435.250 MHz downlink
– 145.940-145.990 MHz uplink

Source Masa JN1GKZ Tokyo Japan

IARU Satellite Frequency Coordination Status http://www.amsat.org.uk/iaru/

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Additional Spectrum in EI – Clarification from IRTS

Frequency Table

Frequency Table

The very welcome announcement of the massive allocation by ComReg of low-band VHF spectrum to the Amateur Service raised some questions about the wording in the document.

Seán Nolan EI7CD, IRTS/ComReg Liaison, has kindly provided this clarification:

The use of AMSAT in ComReg Document 09/45 R4 is regrettable and is a legacy issue carried forward from earlier versions of the Amateur Station Licence Guidelines. Most of ComReg’s documents are commercially sensitive and no draft documents (other than consultations) are published. Although documents relating to amateur radio are not commercially sensitive we do fall under the non-publishing of draft documents embargo.

The use of AMSAT somewhat randomly confuses the actual situation regarding satellite operation. The frequencies in Annex 1 of the Guidelines are available to all CEPT Class 1 and Class 2 licensees. So far as satellite operation is concerned amateurs here can use the satellite segments mentioned (435-438 MHz; 1260-1270 MHz: 5650-5670 MHz –uplink and 5830-5850 MHz –downlink). The “All modes” in the Modes column in Annex 1 covers the relevant operating mode for the satellite concerned. Similarly 10450-10500 MHz can be used for satellite communications.

In the Modes column of Annex 1, all modes are indicated. In many cases “including digimodes” is stated but of course ‘all modes’ includes digimodes. In the definitions in Annex 1 digimodes are defined as “Any digital mode such as —–“. So DSTAR, DMR etc would be included.

We will of course work with ComReg to secure additional spectrum and facilities. The present initiative by ComReg is as a result of such work by IRTS. In this context we would hope in the future to get 2400-2450 MHz among the bands on general release.

Finally some people are wondering why we didn’t get 52-54 MHz. We have of course been seeking this. However, as you know the question of granting 52-54 MHz to Region 1 of the ITU to align with ITU Regions 2 and 3 is the subject of Agenda Item 1.1 of WRC-19. ComReg will be involved in in seeking to establish a CEPT Common Position and so will not move on it before WRC-19. If the IARU WRC-19 initiative is not successful we will seek a national allocation at 50-54 MHz under Article 4.4 of the ITU Radio Regulations.

I realise that the somewhat random use of “AMSAT” and the use of “All Modes” in some places and “All modes including digimodes” in others can lead to confusion. I hope my attempt to ‘clarify’ helps.

Best regards,

Seán Nolan EI7CD
IRTS/ComReg Liaison

The new ComReg amateur radio document can be downloaded from
http://comreg.ie/publication-download/amateur-station-license-guidelines

Amateur radio regulatory changes in Eire
https://amsat-uk.org/2018/05/01/amateur-radio-regulatory-changes-in-eire/

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Ada Lace book features amateur radio and space communications

Emily Calandrelli KD8PKR with her new Ada Lace book

Emily Calandrelli KD8PKR with her new Ada Lace book

Ada Lace, Take Me to Your Leader is a new book written for young people by Emily Calandrelli KD8PKR that features amateur radio and space communications.

Ada is an 8-year-old with a knack for science, mathematics, and solving mysteries with technology. Her latest project is to fix up a ham radio, something that she could use to contact people on this planet and beyond.

The book is available on Amazon at http://amzn.to/2DbKt9L

Emily Calandrelli KD8PKR
https://twitter.com/TheSpaceGal
https://twitter.com/ada_lace

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Find a UK amateur radio training course near you https://thersgb.org/services/coursefinder/

Free online amateur radio Foundation course https://www.essexham.co.uk/train/foundation-online/

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Amateur radio regulatory changes in Eire

ComReg LogoComReg‘s massive allocation of low-band VHF spectrum to radio amateurs in Eire is most welcome and sets an example to other regulators but other aspects of the regulations raise questions especially regarding Amateur-Satellite Service allocations.

Unusually for an official document ComReg seem to use “AMSAT” as an abbreviation for the ITU Amateur-Satellite Service, however, they fail to define exactly what they intend it to means. AMSAT is a registered trademark of a USA Corporation, see https://www.amsat.org/notification-of-trademark-copyright-and-other-proprietary-information/

Frequency Table

Frequency Table

The low-band VHF Amateur Service allocations are now:
30.0-49.0 MHz 50 watts
50.0-52.0 MHz 100 watts
54.0-69.9 MHz 50 watts
69.9-70.5 MHz 50 watts

The national amateur radio society, IRTS, are to be congratulated on achieving amateur access to so much spectrum.

The ComReg document as written appears to mean amateur satellite operation is not permitted in these ITU Amateur-Satellite Service allocations:
435-438 MHz
1260-1270 MHz
5650-5670 MHz
5830-5850 MHz

Oddly satellite operation is permitted in 430-432 MHz but there are no amateur satellites there!

Transmitting to amateur satellites operating in 2400-2450 MHz is only allowed with a Special Permit, it’s not included as standard in the licence. Even with the Permit amateurs will be restricted to a transmitter output of just 25 watts.

ComReg limit which modes that can be used in each band by listing three-character ITU Emission Designators. For example X7F is among those permitted for the 54.0-69.9 MHz band and means Digital Amateur TV (e.g. DVB-S) can be used. Unfortunately it appears to be the only band where X7F is permitted, an unnecessary restriction.

The Emission Designators for digital voice modes such as D-STAR and DMR don’t appear to be listed anywhere suggesting they cannot be used.

In 2006 the UK regulator Ofcom adopted a Technology Neutral approach to amateur radio, they scrapped listing of specific Emission Designators and allowed all modes to be used. It is unfortunate ComReg hasn’t taken this opportunity to do the same.

The new ComReg amateur radio document can be downloaded from
http://comreg.ie/publication-download/amateur-station-license-guidelines

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King’s High School ARISS contact on BBC TV

Nicola Beckford from BBC TV interviewing Eleanor Griffin before the ARISS contact - image credit KHS

Nicola Beckford from BBC TV interviewing Eleanor Griffin before the ARISS contact – image credit KHS

On April 19 student Eleanor Griffin led the live question and answer session between King’s High School (GB4KHS) in Warwick and astronaut Ricky Arnold KE5DAU on the International Space Station (OR4ISS).

Nicola Beckford reporting for BBC Midlands TV on Kings High School ARISS contact - image credit KHS

Nicola Beckford reporting for BBC Midlands TV on Kings High School ARISS contact – image credit KHS

King’s High School strongly encourage their girls to develop their interests both inside and outside the classroom. This culture of empowerment led one of their girls, Eleanor Griffin, to apply to ARISS Europe (Amateur Radio on the International Space Station) for a highly prestigious link-up to the International Space Station.

When Eleanor Griffin was selected to hold a space conversation with an astronaut, she was inspired to set up the Warwick Mars Project, for students across the Warwick Independent Schools Foundation, to further interest in Space Science. Eleanor says: “The moon landings belong to the generation of our grandparents, and the International Space Station to our parents. What will happen in our generation? Will Mankind travel to another planet?”

After the ISS contact when asked what this incredible experience had taught her Eleanor replied “Just do it! No one is going to stop you, if you just go and pursue your dreams, you really can do anything.”

Watch the BBC TV news item broadcast on Midlands Today @bbcmtd. Fast forward to 18:45 into the recording at
https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b09z9tw6/midlands-today-evening-news-19042018

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)
http://www.ariss.org/apply-to-host-an-ariss-contact.html
https://twitter.com/ARISS_status

King’s High School Warwick https://twitter.com/KHSWarwick

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Radio hams receive Slow Scan TV from Space

ISS SSTV 9-9 Edmund Spicer M0MNG 2018-04-11-1730z

ISS SSTV received by Edmund Spicer M0MNG

Radio amateurs around the world are receiving Slow Scan Television images on 145.800 MHz FM from the International Space Station.

The transmissions by ARISS Russia are in celebration of Cosmonautics Day and should continue until 1820 GMT on Saturday, April 14.

Pete M0PSX of Essex Ham reports receiving good pictures using a colinear antenna.

Edmund Spicer M0MNG, a regular guest on the bi-weekly ICQ Amateur Radio Podcast, received an image at 1730 GMT on Wednesday, April 11 using a 5 element ZL Special Yagi and a FT-991. He said it was probably the best quality image he’s ever received from the ISS.

Others have reported receiving images using just a $35 Baofeng UV-5R VHF/UHF FM handheld radio and 1/4 wave antenna.

Read the Essex Ham report which includes times to receive the SSTV signal over Essex
https://www.essexham.co.uk/news/iss-sstv-images-11-april-2018.html

Further information on the Russian ISS SSTV event to celebrate Cosmonautics Day
https://amsat-uk.org/2018/04/08/russian-iss-sstv-cosmonautics-day/

The SSTV can be displayed on a Windows PC using the MMSSTV App, you can even hold an iPhone or iPad next to the radio with the appropriate iOS SSTV App. Links to Apps and other information at
https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

If you receive a full or partial picture from the Space Station your Local Newspaper may like to know http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2016/july/now-is-a-great-time-to-get-ham-radio-publicity.htm

The RSGB produce a handy Media Guide and Template press release for anyone to download and adapt, see http://rsgb.org/main/clubs/media-guide-for-affiliated-societies/

An example of the publicity you can get for the hobby by telling your Local Newspaper
https://amsat-uk.org/2015/04/15/iss-sstv-in-the-press/

 

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ISS amateur radio link-up for UK school

Kings High School Warwick ARISS ContactA contact between Kings High School for Girls in Warwick and the International Space Station is planned for Thursday 19th April at 1205 UT (1305 BST).

The school says:

We strongly encourage our girls to develop their interests both inside and outside the classroom. This culture of empowerment led one of our girls to apply to ARISS Europe (Amateur Radio on the International Space Station) for a highly prestigious link-up to the International Space Station.

This student-led initiative has resulted in a whole-school focus on Space Science, both in the classroom – from Engineering to English Literature – as well as co-curricular activities, including our ‘Mars Society.’

To support this programme, we have appointed our own Space Scientist in Residence – a unique position, we believe, for any school in the country.

Excitement is building for our live link-up to the International Space Station, when pupils from King’s High and Warwick Prep will talk with the astronauts on board.

King’s High And Beyond! – Adventures in Space

John McGuire, Space Scientist in Residence, has joined forces with Stratford Astronomical Society to organise a Stargazing Live event for students and parents of King’s High and Warwick Prep next Friday night. They will enjoy an Introduction to Astronomy, Telescope Talks, and ‘Ask an Astronomer’ sessions, before viewing the skies for themselves. This follows months of Space activity, from the very youngest pupils of Warwick Prep creating Mars models, to King’s students developing their own Amateur Radio Licensing Club, to set up a link between King’s and the International Space Station.

Live Link-Up to the International Space Station

When King’s High student, Eleanor Griffin was selected to hold a space conversation with an astronaut, she was inspired to set up the Warwick Mars Project, for students across the Warwick Independent Schools Foundation, to further interest in Space Science. Eleanor says: ‘The moon landings belong to the generation of our grandparents, and the International Space Station to our parents’. What will happen in our generation? Will Mankind travel to another planet?’ She will lead students in a live Q and A session with astronauts on the International Space Station on 19 April – the actual date depends on where the ISS is in orbit at the time.

From one girl’s interests and ambitions, a generation of King’s High and Warwick Prep pupils will benefit from an extraordinary range of opportunities and life-experience. We are also delighted that pupils from other local schools will be able to share in the excitement, by joining us for a ‘Space Day’ and the link-up itself. All power to our pupils!

The exciting journey pupils take at King’s High has expanded to a whole new dimension this academic year, as we explore the wonders of Space Science, with students from across the Warwick Independent Schools Foundation. At King’s, pupils have studied Space in lessons, from Engineering to English Literature, and developed a programme of student-led activities, including Space Blogs, an Astro-Photography competition, and a Space-themed dinner.

We recently appointed our own Space Scientist in Residence – a unique position, we believe, for any school in the country. Excitement is building for our live link-up to the International Space Station in April, when pupils from Warwick Prep and King’s High will talk with the astronauts on board.

There will be a live web stream from the event further details, will be published closer to the time at
https://amsat-uk.org/
https://twitter.com/AmsatUK
https://twitter.com/ARISS_status

King’s High School Warwick https://twitter.com/KHSWarwick

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Russian ISS SSTV Event to Celebrate Cosmonautics Day

ISS SSTV image 2 received by Mike Rupprecht DK3WN April 12, 2016 at 1556 UT

ISS SSTV image received by Mike Rupprecht DK3WN April 12, 2016 at 1556 UT

ARISS Russia is planning a special Slow Scan Television (SSTV) event April 11-14 from the International Space Station in celebration of Cosmonautics Day.

The transmissions are to begin on April 11 at 11:30 UT and run through April 14 ending at 18:20 UT.

Supporting this event is a computer on the ISS Russian Segment, which stores images that are then transmitted to Earth using amateur radio, specifically the onboard Kenwood TM-D710E transceiver.

Transmitted images will be from the Interkosmos project period of the Soviet space program https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interkosmos

The transmissions which were coordinated with the ARISS scheduling team, will be made on 145.800 MHz FM using the PD-120 SSTV mode.

Note the ISS transmissions use the 5 kHz deviation FM standard rather than the narrow 2.5 kHz used in Europe. If your transceiver has selectable FM filters try using the wider filter. Handheld transceivers generally have a single wide filter fitted as standard and you should get good results outdoors using just a 1/4 wave whip antenna.

The ISS Fan Club site will show you when the space station is in range http://www.issfanclub.com/

ISS SSTV information and links at https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

Post your images on the ARISS-SSTV gallery at http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/

Listen to the ISS when it is over Russia with the R4UAB WebSDR

Listen to the ISS when in range of London with the SUWS WebSDR http://farnham-sdr.com/

Please note that the event is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and subject to change at any time. You can check for updates regarding planned operation at:
ISS Ham https://twitter.com/RF2Space
ARISS Status https://twitter.com/ARISS_status
ARISS SSTV Blog https://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/
AMSAT Bulletin Board http://www.amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/amsat-bb

If you receive a full or partial picture from the Space Station your Local Newspaper may like to know http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2016/july/now-is-a-great-time-to-get-ham-radio-publicity.htm

The RSGB produce a handy Media Guide and Template press release for anyone to download and adapt, see http://rsgb.org/main/clubs/media-guide-for-affiliated-societies/

An example of the publicity you can get for the hobby by telling your Local Newspaper
https://amsat-uk.org/2015/04/15/iss-sstv-in-the-press/

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