Astronaut Salutes Nimoy From Orbit

International Space Station astronaut Terry Virts (@AstroTerry) tweeted this image of a Vulcan hand salute from orbit as a tribute to actor Leonard Nimoy, who died on Friday, Feb. 27, 2015. Nimoy played science officer Mr. Spock in the Star Trek series that served as an inspiration to generat

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NASA Administrator Remembers Leonard Nimoy

Leonard Nimoy was an inspiration to multiple generations of engineers, scientists, astronauts, and other space explorers. As Mr. Spock, he made science and technology important to the story, while never failing to show, by example, that it is the people around us who matter most.

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NASA Sets Coverage for Launch of Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission

NASA’s Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission is set to lift off at 10:44 p.m. EDT Thursday, March 12 from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. There is a 30-minute window for the launch.

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14 February close flyby, 16:12 GMT

This single frame Rosetta navigation camera image was taken from a distance of 15.3 km from the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, at 16:12 GMT on 14 February 2015. The 1024 x 1024 pixel image frame has a resolution of 1.3 m/pixel and measures 1.3 km across.

More information and the original image via the blog: CometWatch: The challenges of a close flyby

This work is licenced under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 IGO (CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO) licence. The user is allowed to reproduce, distribute, adapt, translate and publicly perform this publication, without explicit permission, provided that the content is accompanied by an acknowledgement that the source is credited as 'ESA - European Space Agency’, a direct link to the licence text is provided and that it is clearly indicated if changes were made to the original content. Adaptation/translation/derivatives must be distributed under the same licence terms as this publication. The user must not give any suggestion that ESA necessarily endorses the modifications that you have made. No warranties are given. The license may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as publicity, privacy, or moral rights may limit how you use the material. To view a copy of this license, please visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/

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14 February close flyby, 16:12 GMT

This single frame Rosetta navigation camera image was taken from a distance of 15.3 km from the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, at 16:12 GMT on 14 February 2015. The 1024 x 1024 pixel image frame has a resolution of 1.3 m/pixel and measures 1.3 km across.

More information and the original image via the blog: CometWatch: The challenges of a close flyby

This work is licenced under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 IGO (CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO) licence. The user is allowed to reproduce, distribute, adapt, translate and publicly perform this publication, without explicit permission, provided that the content is accompanied by an acknowledgement that the source is credited as 'ESA - European Space Agency’, a direct link to the licence text is provided and that it is clearly indicated if changes were made to the original content. Adaptation/translation/derivatives must be distributed under the same licence terms as this publication. The user must not give any suggestion that ESA necessarily endorses the modifications that you have made. No warranties are given. The license may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as publicity, privacy, or moral rights may limit how you use the material. To view a copy of this license, please visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/

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Finally visible

NASA astronaut Terry Virts pictured on 21 February during the first of three International Space Station spacewalks being conducted by the Expedition 42 crew this week. ESA astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti who supported the spacewalk from inside the Station, posted this image on Twitter towards the end of the spacewalk, commenting: "Finally, at the very end of the spacewalk Terry was visibile from the Cupola. Now time to get them back inside!".

Connect with Samantha on social media: http://samanthacristoforetti.esa.int

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A galactic cloak for an exploding star

The galaxy pictured here is NGC 4424, located in the constellation of Virgo. It is not visible with the naked eye but has been captured here with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

Although it may not be obvious from this image, NGC 4424 is in fact a spiral galaxy. In this image it is seen more or less edge on, but from above you would be able to see the arms of the galaxy wrapping around its centre to give the characteristic spiral form .

In 2012 astronomers observed a supernova in NGC 4424 — a violent explosion marking the end of a star’s life. During a supernova explosion, a single star can often outshine an entire galaxy. However, the supernova in NGC 4424, dubbed SN 2012cg, cannot be seen here as the image was taken ten years prior to the explosion. Along the central region of the galaxy, clouds of dust block the light from distant stars and create dark patches.

To the left of NGC 4424 there are two bright objects in the frame. The brightest is another, smaller galaxy known as LEDA 213994 and the object closer to NGC 4424 is an anonymous star in our Milky Way.

A version of this image was entered into the Hubble's Hidden Treasures image processing competition by contestant Gilles Chapdelaine.

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Brussels

This false-colour image from the Spot-5 satellite was acquired on 28 September 2011 over central Belgium, capturing the capital city of Brussels (left).

Zooming in on the city, we can see a number of large parks, such as the Parc du Cinquantenaire or Jubelpark in the city’s European Quarter – home to the institutions of the European Union.  Brussels is the de facto capital of the EU, and is a major centre for international politics.

Further west, we can see the Parc de Bruxelles or Warandepark, where the Royal Palace of Brussels and Belgium Parliament are located.

Northeast of the city, we can see the runways of the Brussels Airport.

Darker blue areas throughout the image depict thick vegetation cover, such as the city parks and the large Sonian Forest south of Brussels. Stretching over 4400 hectares, the forest is home to animals such as deer, red squirrel and wild boar. Brown bear and wolf also once roamed this area, but have disappeared through human influence and changes in the ecosystem over hundreds of years.

In the upper right is the city of Leuven in the Flemish Region. The city is home to the headquarters of Anheuser-Busch InBev – the world’s largest brewing group that includes brands such as Beck’s, Budweiser and Stella Artois.

This image is featured on the Earth from Space video programme.

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