Video: Panel Discussion – Realizing Mars Sample Return through Human and Robotic Collaboration

This is Plenary 6, Realizing Mars Sample Return through Human and Robotic Collaboration, from the 67th International Astronautical Congress taking place in Guadalajara, Mexico which was recorded on September 29, 2016.

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Video: Panel Discussion – Realizing Mars Sample Return through Human and Robotic Collaboration

This is Plenary 6, Realizing Mars Sample Return through Human and Robotic Collaboration, from the 67th International Astronautical Congress taking place in Guadalajara, Mexico which was recorded on September 29, 2016.

Click here to visit Original posting

NASA Sets GOES-R/Atlas V Launch Events Coverage

The first spacecraft in a new series of NASA-built advanced geostationary weather satellites is set to launch into orbit aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket Wednesday, Nov. 16. The two-hour launch window opens at 4:42 p.m. EST. Liftoff will occur from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

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Rains of Terror on Exoplanet HD 189733b

This Halloween, take a tour with NASA's Exoplanet Exploration site of some of the most terrifying destinations in our galaxy. The nightmare world of HD 189733 b is the killer you never see coming. To the human eye, this far-off planet looks bright blue. But any space traveler confusing it with the friendly skies of Earth would be badly mistaken.

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Tommaso Ghidini: Materials make the space mission

Space is a not a single environment, but many: so the manufacturing materials and processes used for each new space mission must be chosen with great care. Tommaso Ghidini, Head of ESA’s Materials Technology section, explains how this process works in practice, using the example of Europe’s Solar Orbiter mission, which will venture within 42 million km of the Sun.

The spacecraft’s main body takes cover behind a protective heat shield. But to go on working it will have to keep the same colour despite years of exposure to extreme ultraviolet radiation. At the same time, the shield surface cannot crack, shed material or release vapour, because this might contaminate Solar Orbiter’s highly-sensitive instruments. Any build-up of static was also unacceptable.

Existing surfaces and coatings couldn’t do this; it was time to turn to a solution outside the space industry. ESA’s materials experts reached out to an Irish company called ENBIO focused on coating titanium-made medical implants with carbon black – once used for ancient cave painting. ENBIO and ESA worked together to make their technology space-ready.

To learn more, read his interview here

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