Climate change altered the natural selection – collared flycatcher’s large forehead patch no longer a winner

In a new study, researchers at Uppsala University have found evidence of that climate change upends selection of face characteristics in the collared flycatcher. During the study the annual fitness selection on forehead patch size switched from positive to negative, a reversal that is accounted for by rising spring temperatures at the breeding site.

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Benchmark Shock Tube Experiments for Radiative Heating Relevant to Earth Re-Entry

Abstract: Detailed spectrally and spatially resolved radiance has been measured in the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility for conditions relevant to high speed entry into a variety of atmospheres, including Earth, Venus, Titan, Mars and the Outer Planets. The tests that measured radiation relevant for Earth re-entry are the focus of this work and are taken from campaigns 47, 50, 52 and 57. These tests covered conditions from 8 km/s to 15.5 km/s at initial pressures ranging from 0.05 Torr to 1 Torr...

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Researchers simulate the design of new quantum bits for easier engineering of quantum computers

Quantum computers—a possible future technology that would revolutionize computing by harnessing the bizarre properties of quantum bits, or qubits. Qubits are the quantum analogue to the classical computer bits "0" and "1." Engineering materials that can function as qubits is technically challenging. Using supercomputers, scientists from the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory predicted possible new qubits built out of strained aluminum nitride. Moreover, the scientists showed that certain newly developed qubits in silicon carbide have unusually long lifetimes.

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Cultivating a Grassroots Aerospace Innovation Culture at NASA Ames Research Center

Abstract: This paper details the adaptation of specific 'knowledge production' methods to implement a first of its kind, grassroots event that provokes a cultural change in how the NASA Ames civil servant community engages in the creation and selection of innovative ideas. Historically, selection of innovative proposals at NASA Ames Research Center is done at the highest levels of management, isolating the views and perspectives of the larger civil servant community. Additionally, NASA innovation progr...

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A new world discovered underground

One of the most detailed genetic studies of any ecosystem to date has uncovered incredible biological diversity among subsurface bacteria. Researchers reconstructed the complete sets of genetic material, or genomes, of more than 2,500 microbes. The team took these microbes from sediment and groundwater samples collected from an area prone to flooding in Colorado. These genomes represent 80 percent of all known bacterial phyla. Analyses showed that interorganism interactions are required to turn the carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen cycles. Further, analyses revealed that complex patterns of community assembly are likely key to ecosystem functioning and resilience.

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Improved adhesion paves the way for greater use of thermoplastic composites 

A research at the University of Twente has brought the aviation sector one step closer to lighter aircraft. PhD candidate Yibo Su has developed a method for bonding lightweight constructions made from thermoplastic composites. This means more opportunities to use these materials.

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