Russian Cosmonauts Deploy Satellites

ISS Expedition 52 Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin RN3FI with Tanyusha-SWSU 1 and 2 CubeSats

ISS Expedition 52 Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin RN3FI with Tanyusha-SWSU 1 and 2 CubeSats

On Thursday, July 17, 2017 ISS Expedition 52 Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin, RN3FI and Flight Engineer Sergey Ryazanskiy manually deployed 5 satellites during a spacewalk.

The satellites were deployed from the Pirs airlock module of the International Space Station.

Jonathan McDowell‏ @planet4589 Tweeted this information on the deployment times:
1510 UTC Tomsk-TPU-120
1515 UTC Tanyusha-SWSU 1
1516 UTC Tanyusha-SWSU 2
1521 UTC TNS-0 No. 2
1529 UTC TS-530-Zerkalo (sphere)

Three of the satellites carry amateur radio payloads, Tanyusha-SWSU 1 & 2 on 437.050 MHz with either 9k6 FSK or FM voice announcements and Tomsk-TPU-120 on 437.025 MHz with FM voice announcements.

Tomsk-TPU-120
https://amsat-uk.org/2016/12/29/tomsk-tpu-120-eva-deployment/
Check for reports at http://www.dk3wn.info/p/?cat=325

Tanyusha-SWSU 1 & 2 also known as Radioskaf 6 & 7 (RS6S, RS7S)
https://amsat-uk.org/2017/06/30/russian-tanusha-1-and-2-satellites/
Check for reports at http://www.dk3wn.info/p/?cat=445

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Amateur radio satellite deployment during Russian spacewalk

ISS Expedition 52 Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin RN3FI with Tanusha-SWSU-1

ISS Expedition 52 Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin RN3FI with Tanusha-SWSU-1

Two Russian cosmonauts will venture outside the International Space Station Thursday, Aug. 17, to deploy several nanosatellites, collect research samples and perform structural maintenance.

Coverage of the spacewalk will begin at 10 a.m. EDT (1400 GMT, 3pm BST) on NASA Television and the agency’s website https://www.nasa.gov/nasalive

Expedition 52 Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin, RN3FI and Flight Engineer Sergey Ryazanskiy, of the Russian space agency Roscosmos, will don their spacesuits and exit the station’s Pirs airlock at approximately 10:45 a.m.

Ryazanskiy will begin the schedule of extravehicular activities with the manual deployment of five nanosatellites from a ladder outside the airlock. The satellites, each of which has a mass of about 11 pounds, have a variety of purposes.
[the satellites are thought to include Tanyusha-SWSU 1 & 2 and Tomsk-TPU-120]

One of the satellites, with casings made using 3-D printing technology, will test the effect of the low-Earth-orbit environment on the composition of 3-D printed materials. Another satellite contains recorded greetings to the people of Earth in 11 languages. A third satellite commemorates the 60th anniversary of the Sputnik 1 launch and the 160th anniversary of the birth of Russian scientist Konstantin Tsiolkovsky.

The spacewalkers also will collect residue samples from various locations outside the Russian segment of the station and install handrails and struts to facilitate future excursions.

Yurchikhin will be designated extravehicular crew member 1 (EV1) for this spacewalk, the ninth of his career. Ryazanskiy, embarking on his fourth spacewalk, will be extravehicular crew member 2 (EV2). Both will wear Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes. The spacewalk will be the 202nd in support of space station assembly and maintenance and the seventh spacewalk this year.

Check out the full NASA TV schedule and video streaming information at:
https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

Get breaking news, images and features from the station on Instagram and Twitter at:
http://instagram.com/iss
and
https://twitter.com/Space_Station

Tanyusha-SWSU 1 & 2 also known as Radioskaf 6 & 7 (RS6S, RS7S)
https://amsat-uk.org/2017/06/30/russian-tanusha-1-and-2-satellites/

Tomsk-TPU-120
https://amsat-uk.org/2016/12/29/tomsk-tpu-120-eva-deployment/

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Three ELaNa CubeSats delivered to Space Station

International Space Station – Image Credit NASA

NanoRacks reports on a delivery of payloads to the ISS including three CubeSats which are part of NASA’s Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa) mission.

Houston, TX – August 16, 2017 – SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft successfully berthed to the International Space Station (ISS) on Wednesday after their twelfth commercial resupply (CRS) mission launched from Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A in Cape Canaveral, Florida. The CRS-12 Dragon carried 32 of NanoRacks’ customer payloads to the ISS.

Notably on this mission was the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command (SMDC) and Adcole-Maryland Aerospace’s Kestrel Eye IIM (KE2M) satellite. This satellite is a technology demonstration seeking to validate the concept of using microsatellites in low-Earth orbit to support critical operations. The overall goal is to demonstrate that small satellites are viable platforms for proving critical path support to operations and hosting advanced payloads.

KE2M is the second flagship satellite in NanoRacks’ Kaber Deployment Program. NanoRacks Kaber Deployment Program allows for a larger EXPRESS class of satellites to be deployed from the International Space Station, up to 100 kilograms. NanoRacks deploys these Kaber-class satellites currently through the Japanese Experiment Module Airlock, and will shift deployments to the NanoRacks Airlock Module when the Company’s commercial Airlock becomes operational (planned for 2019).

On this mission are also three satellites that were selected for flight by NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative (CSLI) as part of the twenty second installment of the Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa) missions, and sponsored by the NASA Launch Services Program (LSP). These include NASA Jet Propulsion Lab’s (JPL) ASTERIA, Goddard Spaceflight Center’s DELLINGR, and Pennsylvania State University’s OSIRIS-3U. These CubeSats have a target deployment for mid-November.

Additionally, NanoRacks brought 28 DreamUp student experiments to the ISS, which includes the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program Mission 11 (21 MixStix), Israel’s Ramon Foundation (5 MixStix), Cuberider-1, and the Boy Scouts of America (both NanoLab projects).

The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) project, sponsored by the Center for Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS), is the first-ever experiment in space by BSA. The scouts of Troop 209, a part of the Pathway to Adventure Council based in Chicago, are seeking to better understand how bacteria functions in space, and why virulence patterns in space differ from those on Earth.

With the completion of the CRS-12 launch, NanoRacks has now brought over 580 payloads to the International Space Station since 2009.

NanoRacks Press Release

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Successful ARISS contact with YOTA 2017

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA on ISS HamTV - Credit UHF Satcom

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA on ISS HamTV – Credit UHF Satcom

Young radio amateurs at the Youngsters on the Air (YOTA) event at Gilwell Park made contact with astronaut Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA on the International Space Station.

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA

The first session took place when the ISS came above the horizon at 18:37 GMT (7:37 pm BST) on Tuesday, August 8. The HamTV Digital Amateur Television pictures on 2395 MHz were successfully received and participants were able to see Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA floating in the Columbus module of the ISS. Paolo, operating with the call sign NA1SS, was able to receive the transmission from the YOTA station GB4YOTA but there seemed to be an issue with the 145.800 MHz Ericsson transceiver on the ISS and Paolo’s voice transmissions could not be heard.

The second session took place during the next orbital pass at 20:15 GMT (9:15 pm BST). For this session Paolo operated the amateur radio station (Kenwood TM-D710 transceiver) located in the Russian Service Module.

The transmission was heard loud and clear at Gilwell Park and the young radio amateurs were able to ask Paolo their questions.

The RSGB have shared the video of the event. Fast forward to 2:34:00 for the 145.800 MHz FM contact.

Watch theRSGB Live Stream

A list of the questions the YOTA participants asked is at
https://amsat-uk.org/2017/08/03/ariss-contact-yota-2017/

Youngsters On The Air (YOTA) 2017 http://rsgb.org/main/about-us/yota-2017/

Press Release YOTA 2017 Gilwell Park – PDF download here

You can listen to the ISS using an Online Radio. When Voice or Slow Scan TV transmissions are planned select a Frequency of 145800.0 kHz and Mode FM. For the more frequent Packet Radio transmissions select a Frequency of 145825.0 kHz and Mode FM.
• SUWS WebSDR when ISS in range of London http://websdr.suws.org.uk/
• R4UAB WebSDR when ISS is over Russia
Check the ISS Fan Club site to see current status and when the ISS is in range http://issfanclub.com/

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Find a short Amateur Radio Foundation training course at https://thersgb.org/services/coursefinder/

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Colloquium 2017 Saturday Gala Dinner

The 2017 AMSAT-UK International Space Colloquium is combined with the RSGB Convention on October 14-15 at the Kent Hills Park Conference Centre in Milton Keynes, MK7 6BZ.

If you wish to attend the 2017 AMSAT-UK Colloquium, you should book to attend the RSGB Convention.

The schedule is at http://rsgb.org/main/about-us/rsgb-convention/rsgb-convention-programme/

BUT BEFORE YOU BOOK you might like to consider attending the AMSAT-UK Gala Dinner on the evening of Saturday. October 14 as an alternative to the RSGB Convention dinner. The AMSAT-UK dinner will be held at the Hilton Hotel, which is about 1 km from the Kent Hills Conference Centre; a taxi ride is about £3 per cab. Detailed times will follow, but it will follow similar lines to AMSAT-UK Gala Dinners in previous years. There are normally a few speeches, trophy presentations etc etc.

If you wish to attend the dinner you MUST book this in advance. Dinner Jackets or suits definitely NOT required.

The dinner will be a three course affair, and the cost above does not include drinks which will be available from the hotel bar.

Note that when you book on the RSGB web site you should use the Pick and Mix option to avoid paying for their dinner!

You can book the RSGB Colloquium via http://rsgb.org/main/about-us/rsgb-convention/

You can book the AMSAT-UK Gala Dinner at
http://shop.amsat-uk.org/Colloquium_2017_Sat_Gala_Dinner/p3815740_15631151.aspx

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Satellite has deployable VHF crossed Yagi antenna

NORsat-2 in space deploying its antenna. (Credit: Space Norway AS)

NORsat-2 in space deploying its antenna. (Credit: Space Norway AS)

Radio amateurs Sean Hum VA3SHV and Jeff Nicholls VA3NGJ worked on the design for a deployable VHF crossed Yagi antenna on the recently launched NORsat-2.

The very high frequency (VHF) antenna was designed to unfold from the CubeSat after receiving a command from the Norwegian Space Center to deploy once in orbit. “This antenna is a completely new type of deployable antenna — it unfolds to be more than three times as large as the satellite that took it into orbit,” says Hum. “This is the first time that a deployable antenna of this type has been contemplated and successfully used as a main mission antenna for a CubeSat.”

On July 20, cameras on board the CubeSat confirmed the successful deployment of the antenna.

Read the full story at http://news.engineering.utoronto.ca/u-t-engineering-designed-cubesats-novel-deployable-antenna-launched-orbit/

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ARISS contact planned for YOTA 2017 UK

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA

An International Space Station ARISS contact has been planned for astronaut Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA and the Youngsters on the Air (YOTA) event, which takes place in UK.

The ARISS contact is scheduled Tuesday, August 8, 2017 at approximately 18.38 GMT.

This will be a direct radio contact, operated by GB4YOTA.
Downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz FM.

Moreover, Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA will operate the HamVideo transmitter.

The Goonhilly receiver will be activated sometime Friday, August 4, and will remain active over the weekend and continue to track the ISS until Wednesday morning, August 9. Goonhilly, will be one of several European HamTV reception ground stations contributing to the reception of the HamTV signal for the contact itself.

Two web streams will be available:

1. The normal ARISS/BATC website will be available at https://ariss.batc.tv/hamtv This shows only the HamTV video downlink as an output from the merger facility, with an indication of which registered HamTV stations are providing signal input to the merger.

2. The ARISS Operations UK Team will be web streaming from the YOTA event itself at https://ariss.batc.tv/ This web stream includes introductions and presentations from the RSGB and the YOTA participants before the actual contact itself according to the timetable of the event below.

The timetable of the event is as follows. ALL times are GMT times:

17:30 – All participants and guests to be present at the location. The event web stream (https://ariss.batc.tv/) will start at approximately this time to capture some of the build-up.

17:40 – Formal start of the RSGB/YOTA introductions and presentations.

18:20 – ARISS Operations in the UK take over the event, give the background to what is happening, how it is organised and how all the different elements of the contact are managed.

18:38 – Scheduled time for start of contact with Nespoli operating as NA1SS. The YOTA participants will be using the GB4YOTA callsign.

18:50 – Approximate end of contact with Nespoli. After closing the contact, the operator will invite RSGB/YOTA to formally close down the ARISS event.

YOTA_UK_2017YOTA Information:

The Youngsters on the Air (YOTA) event happens every summer and offers a week-long range of wireless technology activities to 80 young people under the age of 26. The youngsters are all representing their national amateur radio societies and come from 28 countries located in IARU Region 1 (Europe, northern Asia, Africa and the Middle East). This year there will also be a visiting team from Japan.

The 2017 event takes place in the UK at Gilwell Park, the home of the Scouting movement, and includes a special event station GB17YOTA, a transceiver kit building workshop, some antenna building, an Amateur Radio Direction Finding (ARDF) contest and a Summits on the Air (SOTA) activation. The youngsters will be visiting Bletchley Park, the home of the Enigma code breakers, the National Radio Centre, and the Science Museum in London.

Because the event is taking place at the home of Scouting, there will be around 1000 Scouts on site and we hope to have some of them join us for the ISS contact.

Special callsign GB4YOTA will also be activated by ARISS for a special contact with one of the astronauts on board the International Space Station.

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows:

1. Do any of you experiment with ham radio in your free time when you are not obligated to work up there?

2. Typically, how many ham-radio operators are there on the ISS?

3. For ARISS contacts, what frequency bands, and how much power is used to communicate with the ground stations?

4. What are some of the challenges with sending live HD video from space?

5. How important do you consider your interest in amateur radio to your set of technical skills?

6. What would you say to encourage YOTA attendees to continue with their interest in radio?

7. How important is the amateur radio/ham radio setup to ISS backup communications?

8. How do you maintain communications with the worldwide mission control centres?

9. How many different types of communication systems does the ISS have?

10. (ONLY IF HAMTV IS ACTIVE) Can you show us your favourite trick with a water droplet?

11. Do you experience any ionizing phenomena in space that affects the wave propagation in a POSITIVE or NEGATIVE way?

12. When using amateur radio/ham communication equipment in space, what kind of problems can cause difficulties How are these resolved?

13. We are talking via voice (and video?). Can you use other modes, such as straight CW-keys onboard the ISS?

14. What are the main differences between a contact with a ham ground station and a space agency ground station?

15. What are the differences between the HDEV (High Definition Earth Viewing) camera and HamTV?”

16. How many cargo supply ships are docked with the ISS at the moment and do they change the pattern of earth facing communications?”

17. How do you see the ham radio system developing in the next decade?

18. Does everything go according to plan or do parts break and need replacement. If so, do you have a repair facility on board?

19. In space, can you use social media and messaging with others in the same way we use it on Earth?

20. How does the oxygen and electricity production work on board of a spaceship?

21. In which direction do plants grow onboard the space station?

22. What do you do in case of a fire onboard the ISS?

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) logoARISS is an international educational outreach program partnering the volunteer support and leadership from AMSAT and IARU societies around the world with the ISS space agencies partners: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA.

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

Source Gaston Bertels ON4WF ARISS Europe

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2M0SQL Satellite Report

Peter 2M0SQL says that instead of submitting reports to magazines about his satellite activity he’s decided to write blog posts instead allowing more viewers to see what can be worked.

He recently moved to Elgin in Scotland and as a result his DXCC/VUCC totals were reset to zero, so he’s trying to focus on working as many new grid squares and countries as possible.

Although with no real fixed permanent setup at his new QTH he has still made 158 contacts using 11 satellites. Among the notable contacts in July were those with Gabe Zeifman NJ7H who operated from Iceland, the Faroe Islands and then Greenland.

Read the 2M0SQL July Satellite Report at
http://www.2e0sql.co.uk/2017/08/01/july-satellite-report/

Follow Peter on Twitter at https://twitter.com/2m0sql

Peter gave a talk on Portable Satellite Operation to the 2016 AMSAT-UK International Space Colloquium, watch the video at
https://amsat-uk.org/2016/09/07/video-of-portable-satellite-operation-talk/

 

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Young radio hams to talk to ISS astronaut

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA

Some of the young radio amateurs attending the YOTA 2017 event at Gilwell Park will get the chance to talk to astronaut Paulo Nespoli IZ0JPA on the International Space Station using amateur radio.

Paulo will be operating the amateur radio station NA1SS in the Columbus module of the ISS and will to talk to attendees at the Youngsters On The Air 2017 event taking place at Gilwell Park on the Essex/London border. The callsign of the Gilwell Park station will be GB4YOTA and the contact is planned to take place at 1838 GMT on Tuesday, August 8.

The RSGB are hosting YOTA 2017 the prestigious IARU international summer camp at Gilwell Park, the UK Scouting HQ, on August 5-12, 2017.

There will be 80 young people under the age of 26 from 30 countries – from all over IARU Region 1 (Europe/Africa) as well as Japan — representing their national amateur radio societies at this event.

By taking part in a mix of amateur radio and intercultural activities, the young people will be able to build relationships with like-minded people from other countries and develop international friendships through amateur radio—and have a lot of fun!

YOTA 2017 http://rsgb.org/main/about-us/yota-2017/

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)
http://www.ariss.org/contact-the-iss.html

AMSAT-UK: https://amsat-uk.org/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AmsatUK
Facebook: https://facebook.com/AmsatUK
YouTube: https://youtube.com/AmsatUK

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Press reports ISS success of Chertsey Radio Club

International Space Station – Image Credit NASA

The Surrey press report radio amateurs at the Chertsey Radio Club received test transmissions by two satellites inside the International Space Station (ISS). The club also received ISS Slow Scan Television images.

On July 5, the Space Station sent greeting messages in Russian, English, Spanish and Chinese, which were picked up by club members. The messages were sent during test transmissions from two small educational Russian amateur radio satellites, known as Tanusha-1 and Tanusha-2. They will be deployed from the ISS during a spacewalk in August.

As part of the celebrations for the 20th Anniversary of Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS), the ISS sent a set of 12 images using slow scan television (SSTV). The transmissions took place over four days from July 20.

Chertsey Radio Club member James Preece M0JFP was able to receive the signal and convert them into images using a Raspberry Pi 3.

Read the article at
http://www.getsurrey.co.uk/news/surrey-news/surrey-radio-enthusiasts-make-contact-13396651

Chertsey Radio Club ISS SSTV on Raspberry Pi
http://chertseyradioclub.blogspot.co.uk/2017/07/iss-sstv-decoded-on-raspberry-pi3.html
http://chertseyradioclub.blogspot.co.uk/2017/07/iss-sstv-0058-uk-celebrating-20-years.html

Follow Chertsey Radio Club https://twitter.com/chertseyRC

Summer is a great time to get publicity for amateur radio
http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2017/june/summer-is-a-great-time-to-get-publicity-for-ham-radio.htm

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Find a short Amateur Radio Foundation training course at https://thersgb.org/services/coursefinder/

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