Static Electricity May Transport Dust Across Airless Planetary Bodies

A NASA-funded research team, led by Mihaly Horanyi at the University of Colorado-Boulder (CU-Bolder), has conducted laboratory experiments to bring closure to a long-standing issue of electrostatic dust transport, explaining a variety of unusual phenomena on the surfaces of airless planetary bodies, including observations from the Apollo era.

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Static Electricity May Transport Dust Across Airless Planetary Bodies

A NASA-funded research team, led by Mihaly Horanyi at the University of Colorado-Boulder (CU-Bolder), has conducted laboratory experiments to bring closure to a long-standing issue of electrostatic dust transport, explaining a variety of unusual phenomena on the surfaces of airless planetary bodies, including observations from the Apollo era.

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AMSAT-UK International Space Colloquium 2016

UK Space Agency Astronaut Flight Education Programme Manager Libby Jackson will speak at the Gala Dinner

UK Space Agency Astronaut Flight Education Programme Manager Libby Jackson will speak at the Gala Dinner

The 2016 AMSAT-UK International Space Colloquium is now only a few weeks away. The event, taking place at the Holiday Inn, Guildford, GU2 7XZ, will be held over the weekend of July 29-31.

A full programme of presentations, covering all aspects of the amateur satellite world, has been developed for the Saturday and Sunday and a “Beginners Session” is scheduled for the Friday afternoon.

Sessions will include updates on the many new satellites that are expected to be launched over the next few months. This includes Eshail-2 which will carry the first ever geostationary amateur radio transponder and provide more than 8 MHz of new intercontinental spectrum – it will provide coverage to five continents. Additionally we will have a session on how to develop software receivers using GNU radio, reviews of the Tim Peake GB1SS ARISS contacts and the STEM results achieved, information about a new 76 GHz satellite project, a review of how to operate “in the field” and lots more.

UKSA - UK Space Agency LogoAs well as the presentations during the day, Libby Jackson, Astronaut Flight Education Programme Manager at the UK Space Agency, with whom the ARISS UK team worked closely during the Tim Peake mission, will be speaking during the Gala Dinner on the Saturday evening.

Other highlights will include visits to the SSTL facilities (Friday evening and Saturday morning) and the opportunity to see the special ground station equipment that was used for all the ARISS contacts. This will be available for use for contacts during passes of all the available satellite transponders.

Visitors can either turn up on the day, book day passes on the website or, if planning an overnight stay, now is the last week to make their hotel bookings at the preferential rate and which have been block-booked by AMSAT-UK. The URL for the AMSAT-UK shop to book day passes is http://shop.amsat-uk.org/

If you wish to book overnight accommodation, please contact the hotel direct on 01483 784413.  Please note that due to problems with their booking system the hotel will keep our reserved rooms until July 6. Day passes cost £10 per day (incl tea/coffee, etc) , please pay at the AMSAT-UK shop (not hotel reception). If you wish to attend the Gala dinner on Saturday, please book at least 7 days in advance, either with the hotel (by booking dinner, bed, and breakfast), or at the AMSAT-UK shop.

As well at the AMSAT-UK shop, there will be a number of specialist suppliers present, and we are hoping that the RSGB bookshop will also be present

The event is open to all and further information can be found at https://amsat-uk.org/colloquium/

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Tim Peake for Asteroid Day

ESA astronaut Tim Peake wishing everyone a happy Asteroid Day. After his 18 June return from the International Space Station Tim is currently recuperating at the European Astronaut Centre, but took time out to record this message.

After 17 years in orbit the ISS has sustained impacts from tiny micrometeoroids and orbital debris. Planet Earth has been in orbit a whole lot longer – around 4.5 billion years – and has sustained its fair share of dings in that time. Tim and other astronauts have taken plenty of photos of terrestrial impact craters. So asteroids have hit the Earth before, and could do again in future. So humanity needs to know more about them, and investigate what we could do to safeguard Earth if one was spotted coming towards us, through test missions like ESA’s Asteroid Impact Mission – which will learn all it can about a small asteroid, then track it as NASA’s Double Asteroid Redirect Test attempts to deflect its orbit.

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