HTV released from ISS

HTV Demonstration Flight, which completed its cargo transportation mission at the International Space Station (ISS), was unberthed from the ISS by its robotic arm (SSRMS) at 0:02 a.m. on October 31 (JST.) The HTV departed from the ISS at 2:32 a.m. on the 31st. The HTV will leave the ISS orbit, and is scheduled to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere at around 6:25 a.m. on November 2 (Mon.)

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Atlantis’ Payload is Delivered; Astronauts Return to Kennedy

At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the cargo for space shuttle Atlantis' mission to the International Space Station was moved to Launch Pad 39A overnight and will be installed into the shuttle's payload bay.

Technicians will finish testing Atlantis' waste collection system, or toilet, this weekend and ground teams are getting ready for the final part of launch dress rehearsal known as the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, or TCDT.

Today, the STS-129 mission's six astronauts are involved in their final bench review of flight hardware at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, and they will conduct contingency abort simulation training in the motion base simulator.

The crew will fly to Kennedy Monday afternoon for the completion of TCDT. During their two-days at Kennedy they will participate in a simulated launch countdown where they practice liftoff procedures inside the shuttle. Before returning to Johnson on Tuesday, crew members will practice emergency pad evacuation.

On Oct. 29, NASA managers announced the official launch date and time of Nov. 16 at 2:28 p.m. EST for Atlantis' flight to the space station. The only deviation to this date would be if the planned Nov. 14 launch of an Atlas V rocket from nearby Cape Canaveral Air Force Station is delayed. Since the Atlas team has reserved the Eastern Range for Nov. 14 and 15, this means the shuttle's liftoff will move to no earlier than 2:02 p.m. on Nov. 17.

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[release] Public Release of Observation Data (Radiance Spectrum and Images) from “IBUKI” Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT)

The Ministry of the Environment (MOE), the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), and

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Happy Halloween

The Cassini team sends "bats wishes" for a happy, healthy and fun Halloween. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. Image Credit: NASA

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All for One

The International Space Station's Expedition 1 crew took a break from training in the systems integration facility at the Johnson Space Center to pose for a crew photo in this picture from May 2000. From the left are cosmonaut and flight engineer Sergei Krikalev, mission commander William Shepherd and cosmonaut Yuri Gidzenko, Soyuz commander. Behind them is the full fuselage trainer, one of the full-scale mockups used to prepare the crew for certain phases and contingencies of their shuttle return flight. Expedition 1 lifted off to become the first crew to live aboard the station from the Baikonur Cosmodrome on Oct. 31, 2000. Image Credit: NASA

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Atlantis Launch Officially Set

Space shuttle Atlantis, its crew and payload have been given the green light to launch to the International Space Station on Nov. 16 at 2:28 p.m. EST.

At the post-FRR press briefing held at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Bill Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for Space Operations congratulated the Ares I-X launch team for a successful flight test. He then talked about the extremely thorough review of vast amounts of data that led to announcing that Atlantis is certified to launch.

"We accomplished what we wanted to to get ready to move to the next activity … with just a little bit of open work left to do," said Gerstenmaier.

Mike Moses, space shuttle launch integration manager thanked the teams across the country for their hard work getting Atlantis into good shape for the launch. He highlighted the Kennedy teams, complimenting them for working on preparations for both the Atlantis and Ares I-X launches at the same time.

"I'm really pleased -- this is going to be a challenging 11-day mission with three EVAs; the cargo resupply to the station is going to set them up for the future," said Moses.

Mike Leinbach, space shuttle launch director said Atlantis' payload for the STS-129 mission will be transported to Launch Pad 39A by Friday morning. The pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, which protects the shuttle against inclement weather and also provides access to the vehicle's payload bay, is being rolled away. This will allow techs to lift Atlantis' payload up to the pad for installation into the shuttle's cargo bay.

"It's a standard path flow for us and we have little bit of contingency hidden in the flow, so no problems there, said Leinbach. "We should be able to get to our T-0 on the 16th with no issues at all."

The Nov. 16 target date will depend on the planned Nov. 14 launch of an Atlas V rocket from nearby Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The Atlas has reserved the Eastern Range on Nov. 14 and 15. But if the Atlas launch is delayed to Nov. 15, the shuttle's liftoff will move to no earlier than 2:02 p.m. on Nov. 17.

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